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Gender is “Not the Same as Sex”: #CPMX5Incluyente

#CPMX5Incluyente

Image by Twitter user ‏@Valeriaggaona.

Recently held Campus Party in Jalisco, Mexico, duscussed about a wide range of discussions, not always related with the topic of this kind of meetings. Claudia Calvin founder of the collective Mujeres Construyendo, writes on Animal Político some of her conclusions, noting that sexism and women objectivization lays the foundations to exert violence again them.

She explains:

En primer lugar, las características que las sociedades atribuyen a cada sexo son construidas social y culturalmente y, además, van configurando un sistema de relaciones de poder. Esto implica que en cada cultura y contexto se asume que hombres y mujeres deban desempeñar funciones sociales específicas

In the first place, the characteristics societies give to each sex are socially and culturally created, and they set up a power relationship system. This means that in each culture and context it's accepted that men and women must carry on specific social roles.

She then offers a overview of inequalities, gaps and gender barriers on events such as Campus Party and ICT ecosystems:

Hay más hombres que mujeres en todos los niveles de toma de decisiones y en el universo del desarrollo de software y contenidos sucede lo mismo. En el mundo de la computación, según datos de The Atlantic, solamente el 25% de los puestos son ocupados por mujeres. A nivel de CIOs (Chief Information Officers) en el listado de 250 empresas de la lista de Fortune, solamente el 20% ocupa ese cargo. Por ellos los nombres de Sheryl Sandberg, Marissa Mayer y Blanca Treviño son tan importantes. Son, literalmente, gotas de agua en el desierto.

There are more men than women at every decision making level, as it happens within the universe of software and content development. In computer world, according to The Atlantic, only 25% of positions are taken by women. For CIO (Chief Information Officers) on the list of 250 firm on Fortune lists, only 20% of women have that position. That's why names as Sheryl Sandberg, Marissa Mayer and Blanca Treviño are so important. They are, literally, water drops in the desert.

To read more about international relationships, politics, gender and ICT, you can follow Claudia Calvin on Twitter.

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