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The Caucasus Network: Dagestan Blogger Rasul Kadiev

Rasul Kadiev, 1 July 2013, photo by Sergey Ponomarev.

Rasul Kadiev, 1 July 2013, photo by Sergey Ponomarev.


This article is part of an extensive RuNet Echo study of the North Caucasus blogosphere. Explore the complete report and personal stories on The Caucasus Network page.

Rasul Kadiev is a lawyer, born and raised in Makhachkala, Dagestan. Consistently among the region’s top five bloggers, he writes in Russian and uses LiveJournal. His posts are a mix of legal and political commentary on local current events and Dagestan’s various pressing issues.

Kadiev says he’s never encountered any serious censorship and does not believe that his blogging threatens his own safety to a degree that he must adopt self-censorship. Targeting an audience of local journalists, Kadiev describes his own writing as “literate and well-edited, with a touch of dark humor.” Thanks to his blog, it is rumored, he has become a recognized local figure in Dagestan’s corridors of power, which values his honesty but also disapproves of his temerity. Occasionally, media outlets redistribute Kadiev’s blog posts, expanding his readership and reputation. The KavPolit news site, for example, picked up his LJ post on political developments in Dagestan, catapulting it to over 5,000 views.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYYoWgM9Zq44


This article is part of an extensive RuNet Echo study of the North Caucasus blogosphere. Explore the complete report and personal stories on The Caucasus Network page.

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