See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

A Muslim Schoolgirl and the Volgograd Suicide Bombing

Russian special forces training in the North Caucasus. Screenshot from Youtube video published by hardingush.

Russian special forces training in the North Caucasus. Screenshot from Youtube video published by hardingush.

RuNet Echo rarely translates entire blog posts, but in this case we are making an exception. In the wake of the Volgograd bus bombing [Global Voices report], when a female suicide bomber killed 6 people and injured dozens more, a Muslim girl wrote a letter to the anonymous blogger hardingush [Global Voices report], a Russian special forces soldier operating with an anti-terrorist team in the North Caucasus who blogs about his experiences. In this letter the girl addressed some of the concerns, fears, and hopes that many Russian Muslims are faced with today. hardingush published [ru] the letter, eliding the girl's personal information, and correcting her spelling, because, as he said “it contains important information that gives hope for the future…” We also think that it's important. Here is the letter in its entirety:

Салам тебе, Хардингуш!

Я читаю все, что ты пишешь. Почти с самого начала, как ты начал вести блог. Спасибо за то, что ты показываешь людям другой Кавказ. Настоящий. Мне очень нравится как ты пишешь. Я живу в Волгограде. Наша семья приехала сюда из ______. Учусь в ______ классе _______ школы. В Волгограде я живу уже больше 6 лет. Я, конечно, мусульманка. Никогда у меня здесь не было проблем из-за моей религии или национальности. Но когда произошел терракт, родители запретили мне ходить в школу. Они боялись, что меня могут обидеть. Многие девушки, мусульманки тоже не пошли в школы и институт, потому что тоже боялись, что вся вина будет возложена на нас. Мы переписывались с ними в интернете и все друг другу советовали вообще никуда не выходить. 

Позвонила учительница, она тоже волновалась за меня. Я ей сказала, что пока не буду ходить на уроки. Она отнеслась к этому с пониманием. Мне звонили одноклассники, тоже волновались за меня. Я тоже ответила, что пока не могу ходить в школу. На следующее утро ко мне в дверь позвонили одноклассники. Они сказали мне, собирайся, мы будем сопровождать тебя в школу и  домой столько времени, сколько понадобится и никому не позволим обидеть. Все они – русские мальчишки и девочки. Даже мама моя заплакала, когда услышала.

Просто хотела с тобой поделится. Ты недавно писал про народ и про то, что все равнодушны к другу другу. Это не так. Меня провожают в школу и из школы мои русские братья и сестры – я так их называю теперь, потому что не могу называть просто одноклассниками. Мы, мусульмане, против террористов. И никогда их не поддерживали. Не публикуй мое письмо, потому что мне плохо дается русский язык и я допускаю много ошибок. Но, если будешь писать в блоге, исправь, пожалуйста, ошибки и не пиши мое имя и где я учусь. Я их только для тебя написала. Просто хотела рассказать тебе, что у нас не все так плохо. 

Salaam, Hardingush!

I read everything that you write. Almost from the very start, when you started this blog. Thank you for showing people the other Caucasus. The real Caucasus. I really like how you write. I live in Volgograd. Our family moved here from ______. I am studying in the ______ grade, in the ______ school. I've lived in Volgograd for 6 years. I am, of course, a Muslim. I've never had any problems because of my religion or nationality. But, when the terrorist attack occurred, by parents forbade me to go to school. They were afraid someone might hurt me. Many Muslim girls also didn't go to school and university, because they were afraid that we would be blamed. We wrote to each other on the internet and advised each other not to leave home at all.

My teacher called me, she was also worried about me. I told her that for now I wouldn't come to school. She was very understanding about it. My classmates called me as well, they were also worried. I also told them that for now I can't come to school. The next morning my classmates rang our doorbell. They told me, get your stuff, we will escort you to school and back home as long as it takes, and we won't let anyone hurt you. They are all Russian boys and girls. Even my mom started crying when she heard this.

I just wanted to tell you this. Recently you wrote about the people, and about how no one cares about each other. This is not so. I am accompanied to school by my brothers and sisters – I call them that now, because I can't call them simply classmates. We, Muslims, are against terrorists. We have never supported them. Don't publish this letter, because I don't speak Russian very well and I make many mistakes. But, if you do, please correct my mistakes and don't write my name and where I go to school. I wrote them only for you. I just wanted to tell you that things aren't so bad.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site