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Artists Search for Eid in Syria's War

As the number of casualties and refugees continue to rise in Syria, the country's talented young artists turned to their canvases to express their refusal to celebrate Eid Al Adha, the Islamic holiday of sacrifice.

Musician Wael Alkak experimented with traditional Syrian folk music in his latest track, entitled, “Eid Song,” which was inspired by Tammam Azzam’s “Bon Voyage” artwork.

The song has one lyric that build ups as the song moves forward. It roughly translates to:

No one can withstand anyone,
because everyone is sad.
No one can withstand anyone,
because everyone has lost (x2).

No one is left to withstand anyone,
considering everyone has lost.
No one is left to withstand anyone,
considering everyone has runaway.

The track seems to reflect the general nonchalant feel towards Eid, and how people in Syria are perhaps running out of patience. Nevertheless, Alkak's song follows a pattern of pessimism displayed by other Syrian artists as well. Below are a few examples:

Done by Maher A. Husn. It reads, We do not want your Eid.

Done by Maher A. Husn. It reads, “We do not want your Eid”

Done by Wajdi Saleh, entitled, “No Eid while our kid is a martyr,” referring to children martyrs of Ghouta.

Rising artist Sedki Al Imam approaches Eid with jest

Rising artist Sedki Al Imam approaches Eid with jest.On Eid al Adha, Muslims sacrifice a goat or sheepand distribute the meat amongst the poor, neighbors and relatives.

Caricature by Husam al-Saadi shows Bashar Assad butchering Syria's map as though it were an Eid sacrifice.

Caricature by Husam al-Saadi shows Bashar Assad butchering Syria's map as though it were an Eid sacrifice.

 

Suzan Yaseen paints "The Martyr and the Eid Dress."

Suzan Yaseen paints “The Martyrs and the Eid Dress.”

Mohammad Hamawi wraps Syria's Eid in a bloodied gift.

Other artists tackled the humanitarian side of the conflict and focused on refugees:

Hani Abbas sketches a Ferris wheel with refugee tents

Hani Abbas sketches a Ferris wheel with refugee tents

Syria's art scene is nothing if not involving commentary from Kafranbel's people. Twitter user Racan tweets their latest poster:

However, there is an embedded message that could be understood from such art, and that is: Syria's hardship is throttling what remains of the nation and it needs help. Prominent writer Amal Hanano explains the dire reality that people are enduring in Syria, as meat, for instance, has become far too expensive for many to afford.

Through design, the Syrian Revolution Multimedia Team asks that people donate their Eid sacrifice to Syria, making it art with a cause:

Done by the Syrian Revolution Multimedia Team, who are urging people to send their Eid sacrifice to Syria. The sheep says, "Send me to Syria they need me more there."

Done by the Syrian Revolution Multimedia Team, who are urging people to send their Eid sacrifice to Syria. The sheep says, “Send me to Syria they need me more there.”

Even those in diaspora feel Syria's ache, finding it hard to celebrate, as Omar Kuptan puts it:

Others are dreading the distance:

However, among the pessimists and the realists arises a voice wishing Syria a blessed Eid in beautiful typography and bright colors, as though saying, this too shall pass:

By Abdo Meknas

By Abdo Meknas

And pass, it shall.


Copyright of photographs used in this post are to their respective owners, used here with attribution.

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