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Pakistan: Five Bomb Explosions Rock Three Cities In A Day

Wednesday, November 21 was a horrendous day when Taliban attacked Imambargahs, Muharram mourning processions, and law enforcement agencies in KarachiRawalpindi, and QuettaIn total, 20 people lost their lives and more 43 people got injured.

Taliban spokesperson Ehsan Ullah Ehsan bluntly accepted the responsibility for the sectarian attacks on Shia Muslims, and vowed that more attacks of such magnitude will continue to take place in future.

Bomb Blast in Karachi

Two bombs exploded consecutively near an Imambargah in the area of Orangi town. The bomb was planted inside a rickshaw. Mourning processions were not taking place at the time of the blast. Security forces swiftly surrounded the area, pushing the crowd and media people out of danger. Suddenly, a second blast erupted. Major causalities were not reported.

People and Security officials gather at site after bomb blast near Imambargah Hyder-e-Karrar in Orangi Town in Karachi. Image by Owais Aslam Ali. Copyright Demotix (21/11/2012)

On 18th November, a bomb blast exploded in front of an Imambargah in the locality of Abbass Town killing 2 people and left 15 injured.

Bomb Blast in Quetta

This attacked was explicitly targeted on the law enforcement agencies. A 15kg bomb was planted on a motorcycle near the main gate of the district jail. 7 people were killed including 3 personnels from the Frontier Constabulary (FC). More than 16 people got injured.

Bomb Blast in Rawalpindi

A suicide bomber – probably 17 or 18 years of age – exploded himself in between a mourning procession in Dhok Sayidan area. The technique was similar to that used in Karachi. Two bombs exploded one after the other with a forty minute gap in between. This was the most sanguine act of all, killing 23 mourners that included 8 children.

People gather around to look at the destruction caused by a suicide bomb in Rawalpindi. Image by Sajjad Ali Qureshi. Copyright: Demotix (21/11/2012)

Reactions

Human Rights Watch vocally condemned the terrorists acts against Shia Muslims in Pakistan:

“Pakistani authorities need to address the severe danger faced by the Shia population with all necessary security measures. They can start by arresting extremist group members responsible for past attacks.”

Twitter users and netizens condemned these acts of terrorism.

Marvi Sirmed tweets:

@marvisirmed: dear LeJ, many Shias dead. Islam saved. Right? La'anat tum logon per.

Dear Lashkar-e-Jahangvi [A banned extremists organisation], , many Shias dead. Islam saved. Right? May God damn you.

Shamama Abbasi tweets:

@shamama_abbasi: Heart goes out to victims n their families in rawalppindi,karachi blast,what a senseless and tragic act of terror. Salaam Ya Hussyn [Peace be upon Hussain]

Many noted the fact that acts of terrorism perpetrated against Shia Muslims didn't get the same level of attention compared to Israel's attacks on Gaza Strip (See Globalvoices report)

Ghaffar Hussain tweets:

@GhaffarH: Dozens of shia killed in bomb blast in Karachi but the victims aren't Gazans and the killers not Jewish so move along, nothing to see here.

Rohan comments:

I wish pakistan will accept the extreme Islam as their main threat, rather blaming India. I hardly see any gathering or rally protest in streets for these killing. But you people worried about gaza, barma, assam. ?? Dont you feel ashamed about everything??????????

In his blog post, Abdul Nishapuri asks a very pertinent question:

“Why are 6000 Shia children killed in Pakistan less worthy than a few dozen Palestinians?”

Shafi Sial tweets:

@Sahfisial: People in #Pakistan cry loud for Gaza which 90% of them have only heard of whereas#Shia #Hazara & #Ahmadis being killed in their own land!

Basit Saeed tweets:

@basit_saeed: We protest against killings in Gaza but don't even bother condemning Shia genocide! Shitty standards! #Karachi

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