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Yemen: Reasons Saleh is Late!

This post is part of our special coverage Yemen Protests 2011.

Tweeps are having fun with the hashtag #ReasonsSalehIsLate while waiting for a speech by Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh, following reports that he may have been injured when the Presidential Palace in Sanaa was attacked earlier today.

Tweeps toyed with a similar hashtag when ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's speech was delayed – #ReasonsMubarakIsLate

Ibn Adem writes:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate his makeup artist is still working on his face injury.

President of Yemen Ali Abdullah Saleh. Image by US Government, available in public domain.

President of Yemen Ali Abdullah Saleh. Image by US Government, available in public domain.


Marwa_G_H quips:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate ميعاد القااااااااااااااااااااااات…. استنوا شوية #Yemen
He is having qat .. wait a bit

Qat is a stimulant drug, which many people in Yemen, particularly in the North, are addicted to. Studies show that in Yemen, 80 per cent of the males and 45pc of the females were found to be qat users, who had chewed daily for long periods of their life.

In another tweet, she notes:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate he's dead…. waiting for the duplicate to arrive #Yemen

She continues:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate بيغش من خطاب مبارك #Yemen
He is taking cheat notes from Mubarak's speeches

@Logicker picks up the line of reasoning saying:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate emulating #Mubarak, in real life and in terms of Twitter hashtags ;)

And adds:

#ReasonsSalehIsLate playing hard-to-get like most other #Arab dictators.

This post is part of our special coverage Yemen Protests 2011.

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