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Bloodbath in Egypt

"Scene at Rabaa's frontline resembles a warzone." Photo by Egyptian photojournalist Mosa'ab Elshamy,from his Twitter account @mosaaberizing

“Scene at Rabaa's frontline resembles a warzone.” Photo by Egyptian photojournalist Mosa'ab Elshamy on August 14, 2013 from his Twitter account @mosaaberizing

Armed with snipers and tear gas, Egyptian security forces initiated a bloody crackdown on August 14, 2013 to clear supporters of the country's ousted president Mohamed Morsi from two sit-in camps at opposite corners of the capital Cairo, where they have been camped for weeks, demanding Morsi's reinstatement.

The two camp sites - Nahda Square and near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque – became scenes of horrific carnage. A statement issued by the Egypt Anti Coup Alliance said more than 2,000 had been killed. Egypt's Health Ministry said at least 525 people were killed in the operation and clashes across the country, and more than 3500 injured.

The violence also spread beyond Cairo, and Coptic churches were attacked across the country.

Bloodbath in Egypt

21 Aug Egypt: Caught Between a Zombie and a Bloodsucker!
19 Aug China: Egypt's Bloody Crackdown Brings Back Memories of Tiananmen
18 Aug Bodies Pile in Egypt, But Birds Still Singing for Russian Vacationers
16 Aug PHOTO: Churches are Crying in Egypt
15 Aug Rabaa, Egypt: I Have Seen Patients With Their Heads Blown Out
14 Aug Egypt: “I Literally Felt a Bullet Pass Over my Shoulder”
14 Aug Coptic Churches Burnt in Egypt
14 Aug Journalists Covering Egypt Shot At, Arrested and Threatened
14 Aug Conflicting Casualty Reports as Muslim Brotherhood Sit-ins Dispersed in Egypt

Crackdown on Morsi supporters and the Muslim Brotherhood

Ever since Morsi was ousted July 3, his supporters and Muslim Brotherhood members have been protesting and demanding that he be reinstated. Egypt's military has been trying to suppress them, sometimes violently, but the carnage on August 14 was the most violence they have shown recently.

29 Jul Cairo: “Non-stop Sound of Gunshots”
29 Jul In Egypt, Young Men “Die for Nothing”
20 Jul Egyptian Journalist Menna Alaa Attacked by Pro-Morsi Protesters
20 Jul Egyptian Protesters United in Anti-US Chants
20 Jul Pro-Morsi Women Protesters Killed in Mansoura
16 Jul PHOTO: Muslim Brotherhood Surrounds National Security in Cairo

Movement to Overthrow Morsi 

Morsi's one-year reign as the President of Egypt come to an end, following massive coordinated protests calling for the senior leader of the Muslim Brotherhood to resign swept across the country on June 30. Within three days, the Egyptian military responded by suspending the constitution and appointing an interim replacement for Morsi.

The head of the Egyptian Armed Forces General Abdel Fattah Al Sisi made the announcement in a live broadcast on July 3. Al Sisi also announced that preparations will be made for both presidential and parliamentary elections. Morsi responded to Sissi’s statement with this from his Twitter account: “Measures announced by the armed forces’ leadership represent a full coup, categorically rejected by all the free men of our nation.”

Many were happy to see the end of the Muslim Brotherhood's days at the helm of Egyptian politics, but some are worried that the military intervention could have disastrous consequences on the future of Egyptian democracy [ar].

Celebrations in capital Cairo, the night Morsi is removed. Image by A.R Media Bank International Copyright Demotix July 3, 2013

Celebrations in capital city Cairo the night Morsi is removed. Image by A.R Media Bank International. Copyright Demotix July 3, 2013.

16 Jul Revolution or Coup: The Ousting of Morsi
16 Jul Bassem Yousif vs Sandmonkey on Egypt
9 Jul Egypt's “People's Revolution” in the Eyes of Russian
8 Jul Al Jazeera Accused of “Biased” Egypt Coverage
6 Jul Egypt says: “It is NOT a Coup”
5 Jul Morsi Supporters Face-off with Anti-Morsi Protestors across Egypt
3 Jul The Story Behind Morsi's [Fake] Arrest Video
3 Jul Former Egyptian President Morsi Rants on Twitter
3 Jul Egypt:Fighting Sexual Terror in Tahrir Square
3 Jul Egyptians Overthrow Morsi and Muslim Brotherhood Rule
2 Jul Protestor Asks Morsi to Leave in Code
30 Jun Egyptians Want to Overthrow the Regime
19 Jun  Egyptians Plan Protests for #June30 to Topple Muslim Brotherhood Rule

Morsi as President

Morsi was sworn in on 30 June 2012, as Egypt's first democratically elected president. He succeeded Hosni Mubarak, who held office of the President of Egypt for thirty years and was also forced to resign by the army on 11 February 2011, following mass protests in Tahrir square during the 2011 Egyptian revolution.

4 Apr 2013 Give the Egyptian President a Bath!
18 Feb 2013 Egyptians Elected Morsi Because …
31 Jan 2013 Morsi Courts Merkel while Unrest Continues in Egypt
13 Dec 2012 Egypt: Graffiti Over Presidential Palace Walls
20 Nov 2012 Egyptians Want to Overthrow Mursolini
29 Nov 2012 Egypt: Down with The Tyrant – Take Three!!
23 Nov 2012 Has Morsi Pulled a Mubarak and Cut the Internet Off Tahrir Square?
3 Oct 2012 Egypt: Is the New Muslim Brotherhood Logo Aggressive?
18 Aug 2012 Egypt: Decoding Morsi's Ousting of the Generals
25 Jun 2012 Egypt: Introducing the MorsiMeter
24 Jun 2012 Egypt: The New President of Egypt is Mohamed Morsi

Twitter
Hashtags to follow RabaaMorsi|Egypt| June 30

Please contact Global Voices Middle East and North Africa Editor Amira Al Hussaini if you have links or story ideas, or want to add to this page's resource list.

What we do: Global Voices bloggers from the Middle East and North Africa report on how citizens use the Internet and social media to make their voices heard, often translating from Arabic. Check back for further developments to this page.

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