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Radovan Karadžić's Arrest 2008

Background

Radovan Karadžić (Serbian: Радован Караџић), born on June 19, 1945, in what is now Montenegro, was the first President of the Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) following the breakup of Yugoslavia. He was first indicted by the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in July 1995 for authorizing the mass killing of civilians during the siege of Sarajevo. The ICTY issued a second indictment a few months later on genocide charges in connection with the Srebrenica massacre. He went into hiding in 1997 and had been a fugitive since then.

His arrest in Belgrade by Serbian security officers was announced on the evening of July 21, 2008, and the next day it emerged that he had been working for some time at a private clinic in Belgrade, specialising in alternative medicine and psychology under the alias Dr. Dragan David Dabić and under the company name of “Human Quantum Energy.”

In spite of a of $5 million reward for information leading to his capture from the United States, and of being sought after by Interpol and other secret services, Karadžić evaded arrest for 13 years. Blogs across the Balkans have been abuzz with news and commentary on every detail of this astonishing story.

Note: the ICTY's Case Information Sheet for Radovan Karadžić can be downloaded here.

Global Voices Posts about Karadžić

02 August – Bosnia & Herzegovina: Karadžić in The Hague
27 July – Serbia: Demonstrators Attack Journalists in Belgrade
25 July – Serbia: Anglophone Bloggers Continue Discussion of Karadžić's Arrest
23 July – Serbia: African Bloggers’ Reactions to Karadžić's Arrest
23 July – Serbia: Radovan Karadžić was disguised as a doctor
23 July – Croatia: Reactions to the Karadžić arrest
22 July – Serbia: Local Bloggers Discuss the Arrest of Radovan Karadžić
22 July – The Balkans, Russia: Radovan Karadžić
16 July – Bosnia & Herzegovina: Anniversaries of Massacres
12 July – Bosnia & Herzegovina: Srebrenica Anniversary

Other resources in English

- From openDemocracy: Radovan Karadzic: the politics of an arrest by Eric Gordy, Radovan Karadzic’s capture: a moment for history by Dejan Djokic, and Serbia’s tipping-point arrest by Victor Peskin
-From Balkan Insight: It’s Time to Test The Karadzic Myth by Aleksandar Hemon, Karadzic: From Dissident Poet to Most Wanted by Gordana Katana, and Radovan as Saddam? Get Real by Marcus Tanner.
-From Transitions Online: The Rise and Fall of the ‘Butcher of Bosnia’ by Adam Eaglin, End of A Long Chase, and No More Yawns by Katerina Safarikova.
- East Ethnia Blog by Eric Gordy
- Finding Karadzic Blog
- Srebrenica Genocide Blog
- BBC News Mark Mardell's Euroblog: Karadzic finally captured and Spotlight on tribunal
- B92 Blogs: Radovan Karadzic's bad hair day by Hugh Griffiths
- Boing Boing: My neighbor Radovan Karadžić and Dragan Dabić Defeats Radovan Karadžić by Jasmina Tešanović
- LimbicNutrition Weblog: photos and video from a protest in support of Radovan Karadzic


Cartoon (translation from Spanish): “I was famously genocidal, now I am an anonymous doctor” (sign to: “Doctor's office”)

Photos
- Images tagged with ‘Karadzic’ on Flickr
- Sarajevo celebrations after the arrest – at Powiększenia photoblog

If you have suggestions for posts we should be linking to, or if you are a blogger and would like to volunteer to write for Global Voices, please email our Central and Eastern Europe Editor, Veronica Khokhlova.

Photo of Radovan Karadžić from Wikipedia Commons.
Cartoon by Mermadon, used under a Creative Commons License

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