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Tetyana Lokot

Contributor profile · 4 posts · joined 6 December 2013

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I am a researcher and PhD student at Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland. I study social movements, urban protest and digital media in post-Soviet countries.

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Latest posts by Tetyana Lokot

5 March 2014

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Ukraine's Activists Debunk Russian Myths on Crimea

As the conflict between Russia and Ukraine escalates, Russian mass media attempts to distort events in Ukraine are questioned and fact-checked by online activists.

2 March 2014

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Ukrainian Journalists Take Regime's Corruption Public With YanukovychLeaks

A team of Kyiv-based journalists discovered a plethora of damaged legal, financial and other documents on former President Yanukovich's property, salvaged them and are releasing them on a new website.

27 January 2014

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Ukrainian #DigitalMaidan Activism Takes Twitter's Trending Topics by Storm

As Euromaidan protests enter their third month, Ukrainian social media users and activists are finding new ways of using Internet tools to explain their plight and seek international support.

6 December 2013

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As Ukraine's Protests Escalate, #Euromaidan Hashtag Lost in a Sea of Information

Even though it has become harder to find information about Euromaidan protests for the average social networking user, these online tools are actively being used among protesters. Tetyana Lokot explains.

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