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Andrés Monroy-Hernández

Andrés Monroy-Hernández is a Mexican social computing researcher living in the United States. His work focuses on the design and study of social media systems that support collaboration for creative expression and civic engagement. Andrés holds a PhD and a Masters from the MIT Media Lab, and a Bachelor’s from Tec de Monterrey in Mexico. As part of his work at MIT, he created the Scratch Online Community, a website where millions of children create, share, and remix animations and video games. His work has been featured in the New York Times, CNN, and Wired, and has been awarded at Ars Electronica and the MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition. In 2012, he was named one of Boston’s Emerging Leaders by the Boston Business Journal.

He can be reached on Twitter or e-mail.

Disclaimer: Andrés currently works at Microsoft Research and is affiliated with Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, however, all his opinions are his own.

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Latest posts by Andrés Monroy-Hernández

14 March 2014

Facebook ‘Courage for’ Page versus the Knights Templar’s Cartel

Saiph Savage and Andrés Monroy-Hernández have been collecting data on a Facebook page that documents the activities of self-defense militia groups in their fight against a drug cartel in Mexico.

28 September 2012

Mexico: Missing Activist Aleph Jiménez Found Alive

Missing Mexican activist Aleph Jiménez was found alive and claims to have gone in hiding due to safety concerns. Netizens have mixed reactions to the news.

25 September 2012

Mexico: Scientist and Activist Disappears, Family Fears Authorities’ Involvement

Aleph Jiménez, an activist and scientist, has gone missing in México after denouncing police repression following his arrest for participating in a political protest. Two of his colleagues have appeared...

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