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Arabs Gloat at Brazil's World Cup Defeat

 On Twitter, Saudi Hamad Alarify shares this cartoon, drawing attention to the failure of his country's team in international football championships. The comment should read: "I know that feeling bro"


On Twitter, Saudi Hamad Alarify shares this cartoon, drawing attention to the failure of his country's team in international football championships. The comment should read: “I know that feeling bro”

Arabs seem to have watched with glee as Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-finals, which ended a few minutes ago.

Following Brazil's humiliating defeat, Egyptian @kazakhelo jokes to his 13.6k followers on Twitter [ar]:

Never mind. You can still recover. For the next World Cup, Egypt qualifies, and you win.

Obviously, this netizen has no faith in his national team.

And the jokes continue.

Egyptian Hazem Youssef claims:

This is a match that will not be repeated in 100 years.
Germany has scored seven goals so far, in six opportunities to score

And for Bahraini Nader AbdulEman, the defeat of the Brazilian team means much more than football. He tweets [ar]:

The tear gas team leaves the World Cup in a scandalous manner

Brazil is allegedly an exporter of tear gas to Bahrain, used to suppress demonstrators since anti-regime protests started in the country on February 14, 2011.

On a more serious note, Al Jazeera anchor Syrian Faisal Alkasim, with more than 1.5 million followers, wonders:

Many Brazilians protested against the World Cup before it even started. What will they do now after this match with Germany?

And Saudi TV presenter Waled Alfarraj tweets to his 2.13 million followers a similar sentiment:

Brazilians will pour out their anger against the government after losing the finals.
The world was set ablaze a few minutes ago. It really is a scandal

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