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University Student Posts Suicide Note In Facebook, Friends Fail To Save Him

Suicide is a long term social issue of Bangladesh and of all the people reported dead due to suicide worldwide every year, 2.06% are Bangladeshis.

Mahbub Shaheen, a student of Dhaka University, posted a suicide note in Facebook at 7:08PM on 2nd of June, 2014. He wrote:

I am lying on Rail Line. The Train is coming. And I am going to kick out bloody myself, the useless eater.

Once I've posted a comment “I should leave” then after I posted “I have to leave”. Some of you asked me- “From where & where will you go?”

I don't know where I am going. But I am leaving. Leaving useless myself forever.

Good bye, good bye forever.

In the comments section of the above post it is revealed that his friends tried to locate Shaheen who was supposed to reach Dhaka, the capital by a train by the evening. His mobile was unreachable so they tried to inform police and his family but did not know how. A few hours later someone confirmed that his body was found near Kamalapur Railway Station.

This shows that Bangladesh desperately needs an effective suicide prevention hotline to act quickly and save people like Shaheen.

The number one cause for suicide is untreated depression. Depression is treatable and suicide is preventable. You can get help from confidential support lines for the suicidal and those in emotional crisis. Visit Befrienders.org to find a suicide prevention helpline in your country.
  • https://explodie.org/ Aranjedeath

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