See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Ideological Clichés Among Republic Supporters

Paco Prieto writes [es] on La vida como yo la veo [Life as I see it] about religion, politics and freedom after reading some tweets criticizing the presence and looks of some individuals at the rallies for republic after abdication by Juan Carlos, King of Spain.

No entiendo tantas cosas de cierta gente que vive anclada en los clichés del tiempo que me parece que aún vivo en el año en que nací. Hoy el mundo nos conecta a todos a través de Internet, hay avances tecnológicos, mejores coches, mejores televisiones, mejores transportes, y sin embargo, lo que llamamos LIBERTAD, no existe realmente. No existirá mientras se nos tache a los que somos creyentes y cofrades de “Fachas”, ni a los que vestimos como nos da la gana o lo más informal posible de “Perroflautas”, o que por llevar una bandera republicana en una manifestación o no estar de acuerdo con un sistema de monarquía parlamentaria ya no se pueda llevar un antifaz de nazareno o ponerse un costal o trabajar en una junta de una hermandad.

There are so many things about some people that live tied to the clichés of time that I think that I'm still living oin the year I was born in. Today, the world connects everybody through the Internet, there are technologic improvements, better cars, better TVs, better transportation and yet, what we call FREEDOM does not really exist. It won't exist as long as those of us who are believers and members of a brotherhood are still called “Fachas”, or those of us who wear whatever we like to wear are called “Perroflautas” [hippie-like], or because we carry a Republican flag during a rally or disagree with a parliamentary monarchy system we can no longer use a penitent mask nor wear a sack or work at the board of a brotherhood.

This post was part of the fifth #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of bogs on GV] on June, 2, 2014.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site