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Sisi Wins Egyptian Presidential Elections; Only Opponent Sabahi Comes in Third

Egypt has a new president in the third elections it has had in as many years. General Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi won a landslide victory, topping his only oppopent Hamdeen Sabahi, who came in third place. After three days of voting, the preliminary results are out. Sisi is reported to have won 93.3 per cent of the votes, Hamdeen took 3pc and 3.7pc of the votes were declared void.

On Twitter, netizens met the news with sarcasm and snark.

Egyptian Aida Elkashef says [ar]:

What makes you laugh and cry at the same time is that in elections, with only two candidates, Hamdeen is in third place after the votes that have been declared void

Sherief Gaber asks:

And Egyptian Hosam El Sokkari notes [ar]:

The human being is a voting animal (other than this he has no value)

Meanwhile, Nabeel wonders why people are upset Sabahi was not up to the competition. He asks:

Why are we laying the blame on Hamdeen? Because he got few votes? Who suggested for a moment that he could ever win?

Despite Sisi's landslide win, Amro Ali sets a challenge:

Lebanese satirist Karl Sharro adds:

From Bahrain, Abo Omar Al Shafee draws parallels to Bahrain. He tweets:

Just like the presidential elections were a success in Egypt, the parliamentary elections will definitely be a success in Bahrain. There is no consolation for those who boycott

And, in conclusion, Egyptian activist Alaa Abdel Fattah tweets:

You have turned out to be such an idiot Sisi

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