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El Salvador: Letter to Minister of Public Works

[All links direct to pages in Spanish.]

On the blog Siguiente página, Paolo Lüers posts a letter addressed to the Minister of Public Words of El Salvador, Gerson Martínez, where with some irony he makes reference to the announcement made by the minister on a local TV station where he stated that by mid May the new Integrated Transportation System for the Metropolitan Area of San Salvador (SITRAMSS, for its Spanish name) will start working:

Mid-May? But that's three weeks from now. [...] the construction of the stations has just started. But you say it all will be working in three weeks.

The drivers haven't been trained yet for those new and extra-long buses. And until now, there are no garages for the maintenance of the new buses. In fact, nobody knows where they will be built. But you say it all will be working in three weeks.

The government hasn't negotiated the fees for the new system, nor the way how the system will be connected to the old bus lines. Well, the authorized buses of the current lines don't know the routes of their buses, as they won't be able to go via Juan Pablo road. But you say it all will be working in three weeks.

He ends by saying:

Well, my dear Gerson, it's been 5 years already and we got to know your talent on improvisation and your way of dealing with the resulting vehicular chaos. You are going to do well in this new improvisation test. [...] We all have already summoned all of our patience and resignation.

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