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Ukraine: “A Young Man Died in My Arms” #EuroMaidan

From the roof of Globus shopping center

The view over Independence Square from the roof of Globus shopping center in Kyiv, Ukraine (February 19)
Photo by Anastasia Vlasova © Copyright Demotix

A student in Kyiv, Ukraine tweeted from morning till past midnight on the day of a violent standoff between protesters and police which led to as many as 25 deaths and many hundreds wounded.

On this day, February 18, 2014, the Ukrainian Parliament failed to limit the powers of President Viktor Yanukovych, the main target of the protests that have continued for three months on Maidan Nezalezhnosti [Independence Square].

Below are selected tweets @Mira_mp who witnessed events first-hand as a protester in the square, and eventually as a volunteer at a hospital to help the wounded.

Her first tweets reflect the beginning of the clashes:

Looks like I will breathe in more than enough of this gas, again.

On Hrushevskogo [street where first clashes broke out a month earlier] tires are burning again)

In [Mariinsky park] people are shouting “slaves!” to titushki [thugs hired by the government to beat and intimidate protesters] and show them money)) they get embarrassed and turn their heads away

A tent in [Mariinsky park] is burning right now. In general, it is unclear what is going on here. and hardly any [cell phone] connection is available.

Her next tweets are sent on the way to a hospital. The time stamps indicate that it was after the police and special forces started cracking down on protesters near the parliament.

We are going to a hospital. Two of my dad's friends have serious injuries – to the head and arm. this revolution is turning into a war.

There were concerns that police might arrest those who report injuries, and she tweeted:

Maybe we should not got to a hospital. Just stop by a pharmacy, treat their wounds and get them home.

Later on, she returned to Maidan to follow events in the parliament.

Now we are back to Maidan. I hope Bo regains consciousness, he has a head injury.

We were watching a live broadcast from the [parliament]. Some old lady: “These are the bastards my neighbors voted for? today they will be in trouble!” I love these people!)

[People] are following Livestreams on Maidan. Women and men without [helmets and other protective clothing] are not allowed inside.

Rybak [Speaker of the Parliament] was taken away in an ambulance. Reaction of the protesters – does anyone know what ambulance it was? we should throw [molotov] cocktails!

Three people [reported] dead. Peaceful protest has turned into a war.

Berkut [special forces unit] is shooting [at us] and throwing stones from Globus [a shopping center on Maidan].

A huge crowd on the street. Metro is shut down, many are walking to Maidan.

7 minutes to 6pm [the deadline government has set for protesters to leave]. I am endlessly proud of everyone who has stayed on Maidan! There are many elderly people and women here!

As special forces began storming Maidan numerous injuries were reported on both sides. Protesters called on women and children to leave the site of clashes.

I cannot stay at home. Going to a hospital on Shovkovycha [street].

I cannot lie to parents and Dan. But I cannot stay away from Maidan either. Switch off the cell phone and no questions [can be] asked.

Her next tweet is from the hospital.

The doctors are saying nothing about Bo's condition. I cannot read updates on [Twitter] and my battery is dying. I'll see you there.

We came to hospital No 17. There's a huge number of injured people here! Kyevers come and take home those with less serious wounds.

So much blood and dead bodies. This is the scariest night of my life.

A young man shot in the head and stomach died in my arms. I will never forget this night.

This post is part of our special coverage on Ukraine's #EuroMaidan protests.

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