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The Hilarity of Murder Among Russians

Written by Kevin Rothrock On 16 February 2014 @ 22:39 pm | 1 Comment

In Citizen Media, Eastern & Central Europe, English, Freedom of Speech, Language, Politics, RuNet Echo, Russia, Russian

Alexey Navalny (left) and Irina Yarovaya (right). Images from Wikimedia commons.

Alexey Navalny (left) and Irina Yarovaya (right). Images from Wikimedia commons.

Where do you draw the line between a joke and a death threat? That question has been on Russians’ minds this week, after a controversial tweet [1] [ru] by famed blogger and opposition leader Alexey Navalny, who described the assassination [2] [ru] of a judge in Ukraine as a “greeting card” to judges in Russia. The murder victim, Aleksandr Lobodenko, was responsible for sentencing several protesters convicted of rioting in Ukraine’s Poltava region, leading police to believe the killing was politically motivated.

Duma deputy Irina Yarovaya quickly branded [3] [ru] Navalny’s tweet “extremist,” interpreting it literally. Navalny’s message, she claimed, “not only mocks a man’s death, but transmits a positive attitude about murder.” Other state officials soon chimed in. Kirill Kabanov, a member of the President’s Council on Human Rights, implied that he believes Navalny was joking, but warned that some of his readers might misunderstand, saying, “Navalny has a pretty big group of fans, who aren’t always evenly balanced, and some of them might see [the tweet] as a call to action.” Georgy Fedorov, a member of Russia’s Civic Chamber, accused [4] [ru] Navalny of being a thug disguised as an activist, calling the tweet “reckless” and “twisted.”

A day after his “greeting card” tweet, Navalny responded [5] [ru] to the backlash, addressing only Yarovaya. Changing the topic entirely, he pummeled Yarovaya for hiding a luxurious Moscow apartment in her daughter’s name. Indeed, Navalny first blogged about the secret accommodations nearly a year ago, in March 2013, when he republished [6] [ru] findings by an opposition-leaning newspaper. At the time, Yarovaya denied the accusation, calling it “a dirty insinuation.” This week, Navalny presented on his blog a copy of a real estate title in the name of Yarovaya’s daughter for a four-bedroom apartment in a posh area [7] of Moscow.

Navalny offered to delete his tweet about the Ukrainian judge’s murder, if Yarovaya could clarify how her daughter, at 18-years-old, managed to buy property worth an estimated three million dollars. Comedically undeterred, Navalny even offered, in the event of an explanation from Yarovaya, to compose a new tweet, “calling on people never to kill on-the-take judges or corrupt deputies.”

Navalny’s sarcasm has always been a major feature of his persona. Particularly before he became one of the political opposition’s most prominent figures, Navalny’s public image was foremost associated with his blogging. Though he rarely responds to comments on LiveJournal these days, and his blog posts now are heavier in information than opinion, Navalny’s voice online is still consistently snide and disparaging. This is not to say he’s meaner than most using the Internet, but Navalny’s manner distinctly remains a blogger’s style.

How else can we explain why Navalny considers it appropriate to issue a mock death threat to judges throughout Russia? In a year that has kicked off to multiple harsh reactions by authorities in response to ‘offensive utterances,’ Navalny is clearly advertising his fearlessness about pushing the bounds of free speech. Others elsewhere in Russia have responded with similar resolve (or stubbornness, depending on your point of view), when accused of speaking irresponsibly. TV Rain may have apologized and canceled a program, after it caught hell [8] for a survey about abandoning Leningrad to the Nazis, but the station’s management refused to fire anyone. Victor Shenderovich, who enraged [9] many by noting uncomfortable similarities between Russian and fascist Olympians, has stuck to his guns and defended himself against critics who say he crossed a line.

Navalny may very well think he’s rallying behind the country’s beleaguered and besieged civil society. His choice of resistance—turning a man’s killing into a jab at Russia’s own admittedly hated judges—may have been in poor taste, but Navalny is far from the only opposition member who’s alluded to prospects for Ukrainian-style unrest in Russia. Making this stand with a joke, however (and then refusing to defend it directly), suggests that Navalny and his generation have room to mature.


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URL to article: http://globalvoicesonline.org/2014/02/16/the-hilarity-of-murder-among-russians/

URLs in this post:

[1] tweet: https://twitter.com/navalny/statuses/433537573797892096

[2] assassination: http://kommersant.ru/doc/2406275

[3] branded: http://www.bfm.ru/news/247168?doctype=news

[4] accused: http://www.vesti.ru/doc.html?id=1280489&1280489\

[5] responded: http://navalny.livejournal.com/907842.html

[6] republished: http://navalny.livejournal.com/778356.html

[7] posh area: https://www.google.com/maps/@55.780442,37.596938,3a,75y,5.54h,115.16t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sp2yavOfs0ZDlS8Lyw0KH8g!2e0

[8] caught hell: http://globalvoicesonline.org/2014/01/28/so-long-to-russias-only-independent-tv-station/

[9] enraged: http://globalvoicesonline.org/2014/02/11/russias-patriotic-overdrive-in-sochi/

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