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Uruguayan ‘Asado', Much More Than Just a Barbecue

Written by Guillermo Vidal · Translated by Eleanor Staniforth On 7 February 2014 @ 11:26 am | 1 Comment

In Argentina, Arts & Culture, Citizen Media, Food, Spanish, Travel, Uruguay, Video, Weblog

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Photo published by Jorge Alonzo [1] on Flickr, under Creative Commons licence (CC BY-SA 2.0)

When we think of Uruguayan cuisine, one iconic dish always comes to mind: the ‘asado [2]‘, or barbecue. But this is more than just a traditional dish, it represents the country's whole identity.

This dish is an icon of Uruguayan and Argentine tradition par excellence, acting as a social linchpin, as one of the most strongly rooted customs and as a symbol of friendship. No-one, or nearly no-one, prepares a barbecue for themselves alone. The barbecue is a reason to meet, an excuse for a get-together, to bring together those who are separated for whatever reason.

On Vimeo, Geoff Stellfox [3] shares a brief video [4] of a traditional Uruguayan ‘asado':

The ‘asado’ is also a cause of rivalry between opposite shores of the Río de la Plata. Both Argentines and Uruguayans boast of having the best barbecue in a debate as varied as there are palates in the world.

The daily newspaper El País [5] [es] comments:

Los argentinos dicen que son ellos los que hacen el mejor asado, a veces nos reconocen que tenemos mejor carne (excepto el bife de chorizo que es argentino por unanimidad), nos matamos por la mejor receta del chimichurri, nos reímos de los mexicanos que cocinan a la llama y descalificamos a los porteños que cocinan con carbón.

The Argentines claim that they are the ones who make the best barbecue, they do occasionally admit that we have better meat (except the ‘bife de chorizo’ which is Argentine by definition), we batter each other over the best recipe for ‘chimichurri [6]‘ [a special sauce for the meat], we laugh at the Mexicans who cook in the flame and we dismiss the Porteños who cook using charcoal.

When we speak of the barbecue, we are not necessarily referring to a mere lump of cooked meat, but rather to all the paraphernalia which surrounds it, the different kinds of meat and vegetables so that everybody feels included, whether they are meat-eaters or vegetarian. The fire which brings people together and protects them also has a central role, as it has done since the dawn of humanity.

In the absence of a grill, many households have substituted the typical grilled barbecue [7] [es] for the oven-baked barbecue in their daily cooking. This option is considered a second-best by connoisseurs of the ‘asado', but it is easier to work in to the daily life of Uruguayan families. In order to simplify the dish's preparation still further, the well-known chef Sergio Puglia [8] [es] even suggests a barbecue with salsa criolla [9] [es] made in the microwave on his website.

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Photo published by Bruno Maestrini [10] on Flickr, under Creative Commons licence (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The role of the barbecuer -'asador’ in Spanish- is fundamental to this social event, transforming them into the architect of the feast and to a certain extent, into a master of ceremonies. The barbecuer is the one who takes the lead in this dish, the one who manages the timing and signals when and how to savour their work. The skill of the barbecuer determines the quality of the barbecue and if they are successful, they will receive praise and applause. However, if they get it wrong they will be the target of taunts and reprimands, until they manage to redeem themselves with another barbecue which meets expectations.

The traditional midday barbecue held on construction sites constitutes another iconic moment in the life of the dish. This is a ritual for construction workers who gather to eat together, regain strength to continue working and strengthen the brotherly bonds which make it easier to work and live together during these tough working days.

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Photo published by Nae [11] on Flickr, under Creative Commons licence (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Besides the traditions and the friendship, there is also a veil of mystery surrounding a good ‘asado'. Each barbecuer has their secrets and their own particular way of preparing the meat, which gives each barbecue its unique and unrepeatable taste. Even if these secrets were to be revealed, it would still be impossible to repeat as the barbecue is much more than just a dish, it is a magical moment to be shared.

In Uruguay, but above all in Montevideo, the majority of gastronomic venues are specialised barbecues [12] [es] or they have the barbecue as an option on their menu.

The daily newspaper El Observador [13] [es] visited one of these venues to reveal the secrets for making the best Uruguayan ‘asado’ [14] [es]:


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URL to article: http://globalvoicesonline.org/2014/02/07/uruguayan-asado-much-more-than-just-a-barbecue/

URLs in this post:

[1] Jorge Alonzo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/forsersa/

[2] asado: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asado

[3] Geoff Stellfox: http://vimeo.com/geoffstellfox

[4] video: http://vimeo.com/75524532

[5] El País: http://viajes.elpais.com.uy/2011/05/27/como-hacer-un-buen-asado/

[6] chimichurri: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimichurri

[7] grilled barbecue: http://www.universococina.com/como-hacer-asado-a-las-brasas/

[8] Sergio Puglia: https://twitter.com/pugliainvita

[9] barbecue with salsa criolla: http://www.pugliacocina.com/asp/receta.asp?idreceta=911

[10] Bruno Maestrini: http://www.flickr.com/photos/buruno/

[11] Nae: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nae/

[12] specialised barbecues: http://www.restaurantesenmontevideo.com/tag/parrilla/

[13] El Observador: http://www.elobservador.com.uy

[14] secrets for making the best Uruguayan ‘asado’: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy0u6NIVu9I

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