Close

Donate today to keep Global Voices strong!

Watch the video: We Are Global Voices!

We report on 167 countries. We translate in 35 languages. We are Global Voices. Watch the video »

Over 800 of us from all over the world work together to bring you stories that are hard to find by yourself. But we can’t do it alone. Even though most of us are volunteers, we still need your help to support our editors, our technology, outreach and advocacy projects, and our community events.

Donate now »
GlobalVoices in Learn more »

PHOTOS: Humans of Ethiopia

Inspired by Brandon Stanton's Humans of New York (HONY), Nina Steinberg has created a Facebook page Humans of Ethiopia that provides glimpses into people's lives in Ethiopia.

The description reads:

As I explore Ethiopia this summer I have decided to create a space where I can share my glimpses into the lives of strangers, new friends, and the fascinating way of life I am coming to understand here. Inspired by Brandon's Humans of New York.

Take a look at a few photographs republished from the Humans of Ethiopia page. 

Weaving. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

Traditional cloth weaving is a centuries-old tradition in Ethiopia. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

Camouflage

Ethiopian soldiers walking in an empty street. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

Ethiopian women carrying wood on their back. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

Ethiopian women carry wood on their backs to make a living. The load they carry goes up to 70 pounds and the hike distances that can be more or less than 18 miles. Some of these women may even weigh less than the load they are carrying. Their average daily income is less than two US dollars. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

Ready for Ethiopia coffee ceremony. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

An Ethiopian coffee ceremony is a beautiful ritualized way of drinking coffee. The green coffee beans are roasted and then the pan is walked around the room so that everyone can get a waft of the coffee aroma. The coffee beans are crushed, mortar-and-pestle style. The coffee powder is then boiled in a clay pot called a Jebena (seen in the left of the photo). Finally, the coffee is poured into little china cups on a tray and served to everyone – it is served three times. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

I caught them waving chat at the goat and laughed at the thought of a goat getting high. But when I came over to snap a photo, the father wouldn’t smile until he clarified that he was only feeding the goat chat… not his precious little girl. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

I caught them waving chat at the goat and laughed at the thought of a goat getting high. But when I came over to snap a photo, the father wouldn’t smile until he clarified that he was only feeding the goat chat… not his precious little girl. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

Eat at facefood. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

Eat at facefood. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

“The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most.” -John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.
“The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most.”
-John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.
"I designed and made what I'm wearing." - Salam Nigussie. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia.

Ethiopian designer, Salam Nigussie, showing off her product: “I designed and made what I'm wearing.” – Salam Nigussie. Photo by Humans of Ethiopia. Used with permission.

  • Pingback: Ethiopia News – 5 Jan 2014 | Africa

  • Ethiopian_one

    do the locals know where their photos are being posted and have they given consent?

  • Mike J.

    Westerners shamelessly exploit poor people.

  • Gavin

    A good reflection of some aspects of life in Ethiopia. Well done!

World regions

Countries

Languages