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Iran: Two Poets Arrested

Poets Mehdi Mousavi and Fatemeh Ekhtesari disappeared in Iran. News reported that the two have been detained since early December. More than two hundred people signed an online petition and called on the UN to take action about the situation of cultural activists particularly the case of these two young poets in Iran.

  • http://www.twitter.com/changeirannow Change Iran Now

    Progress towards a nuclear deal should by no means lessen
    international attention to the human rights violations that have reached crisis
    levels in Iran since the disputed 2009 election and which continue to this day
    despite the election of Hassan Rouhani. For nearly a decade, the nuclear issue
    has eclipsed the struggle for human rights inside Iran on the international
    stage. As Iran’s foreign policy makers move towards rapprochement with the West
    after 34 years of estrangement, Iranians are worried that their basic rights,
    instead of being elevated to the importance it deserves, will be sacrificed in
    these negotiations. They fear that repression in Iran could even intensify if
    the regime concludes that once a nuclear deal with the international community
    is reached, there will be little international pressure to improve the
    country’s human rights record.

  • Pingback: Poetry “doesn’t matter” — and it gets poets killed. Um. | louder please

  • Pingback: The Ploughshares Round-Down: The State of Poetry in the US | Ploughshares

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