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Pro-Assad And/Or Anti-War Demonstrations?

A pro-Assad protest in Washington DC. In addition to waving the Syrian flag, an Israeli flag is seen among the crowd. Photograph shared by Eiad Charbaji on his public Facebook page

A pro-Assad protest in Washington DC. In addition to waving the Syrian flag, an Israeli flag is seen among the crowd. Photograph shared by Eiad Charbaji on his public Facebook page

Anti-war protests have been staged against US efforts to strike Syria. Netizens chart some of the protests, where pro-Syrian president Bashar Al Assad crowds were present. The question they ask is whether pro-Assad protesters can be anti-war, given the war Assad has been waging against Syrians since anti-regime protests started in the country in March 2011.

M. Scott Mahaskey shares a photograph of anti-war – and pro-Assad – protesters wearing Bashar Al Assad T-shirts outside the White House:

Syrian Nader shares another photograph, from a pro-Assad protest, also in Washington DC:

In addition to Syrian flags, one protester is seen waving an Israeli flag in this photograph.

Closer home, a pro-Assad demonstration was staged in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, the epi-centre of the Egyptian revolution.

Tom Dale comments:

Ahmed Aggour shares the link to the same video above and comments:

Syrian activist Yasmine Jandali argues that the pro-Assad crowd, cannot be anti-war too – as Assad is waging a war against his own people. She tweets:

Syrian Farah, who lives in the UAE, states the notion more bluntly:

And Shiyam Galyon draws a shocking comparison:

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