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VIDEO: Police Brutality Under the Acropolis

Blogger alepouda remixed footage from a 2007 Greek tourism campaign promoting the “true Greek experience” with a video of police aggression against protesters at a rally on 10 July, 2013 in Thisseio in support of anarchist Kostas Sakkas, accused of terrorism and detained without trial since December 2010, who is in the terminal stages of a hunger strike.

Activist Kinimatini, who shot the video in question, was herself injured by police at the demonstration. Omnia TV reporter GiaNt described his own arrest and injury [el]:

Four flashbangs, possibly because I was holding a camera, exploded at my feet. [..] They invaded an ice cream parlor, threatening employees [..] Shouting, swearing and beating me, they threw me down next to other detainees. [..] They watched my video and hooted, “we fucked you up”. [..] A plainclothes officer led me to an office, where he forced me to delete the video.

GiaNt was later released and recovered his own video. The Court of Appeals ordered Kostas Sakkas to be released the following day, but he was deemed a flight risk and bail was set at 30,000 euros (about 39,000 US dollars).

  • Pingback: VIDEO: Police Brutality Under the Acropolis | OccuWorld

  • Shojib Ashrafi Na Ashrafi

    Oh wow, that’s the least self-aware quote I’ve ever read. I wouldn’t be surprised if there were a quote from that very same day advocating the opposite for a cop.
    Fuck man, these assholes think this party’ll never end, but the longer it goes the worse it’s gonna be.

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