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Miguel Bosé on Peruvian Cuisine

Spanish singer and artist Miguel Bosé, currently visiting Peru, became a trending topic on Twitter with the hashtag #PreguntasParaMiguelBose [questions for Miguel Bosé] when he refused to answer if he had tried pisco sour and cebiche during a press conference.

Then, Bosé answered tongue in cheek, as reported by website Diario16 [es]:

Bosé dijo con cierta ironía sobre los potajes peruanos: “No sé lo que es el pisco sour ni el cebiche”.

“¿Alguien se cree lo que me está preguntando? [...] Las causas [es], la papa a la huancaína. Tengo una excelente cocinera peruana en mi casa. Imagínese si no conozco la comida peruana. Imagínese cuántas veces me he emborrachado con pisco sour desde hace 37 años. ¿Es eso lo que usted quiere saber?, ¿lo que quiere que le cuente?”, indicó Bosé a una periodista.

[...] “Hay que desechar de una vez esas preguntas que se le hacen a una niña o niño de doce años de cuál es tu color preferido”, agregó.

Tongue in cheek, Bosé said about Peruvian dishes: “I don't know what pisco sour nor cebiche are”.

“Is someone listening what she is asking me? [...] The causas [es], the papa a la huancaína. I have an excellent Peruvian cook back home. Go figure if I don't know Peruvian cuisine. Go figure how many times I've got drunk with pisco sour for the last 37 years. Is that what you want to know?, what you want me to tell you?”, noted Bosé to a journalist.

[...] “We have to dismiss once and for all those questions posed to a twelve-year old child asking about their favorite color”, he added.

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