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Google CEO's Trip to North Korea, From Schmidt's Daughter's Blog

Google CEO Eric Schmidt visited North Korea last month and his daughter shared in her blog what the delegation saw in the hermit kingdom. Some of highlights from the blog:

[describing the nation's top internet facility] Looks great, right? All this activity, all those monitors. [...] One problem: No one was actually doing anything. A few scrolled or clicked, but the rest just stared[...]Not a head turn, no eye contact, no reaction to stimuli. They might as well have been figurines.

  • Don_T_Red_Onmi

    I actually really like her simple, yet candid, harmless and open observation. Small observations over time helped Cuba open their society ‘a bit,’ and that little move was healthy for their economy. For example, it may also seem quit small news these days, but “Mathias Rust flew straight towards Moscow and landed his small Cessna 172 in Red Square on May 28, 1987.” Nothing really earth shattering resulted from that flight. Sometimes, small symbolic thoughtful gestures can ‘opened a few doors’ and the Soviet Union evolved, allowing for much expansion of Russia’s present economy and some basic freedoms. Russia’s economy has become a powerhouse since that time. You cannot quite say any cause and effect from any short paragraph, just like you cannot say the motion of a feather in Brazil can really cause a typhoon in Japan, but some small gestures can advance society in great, subtle, and wonderful ways. My personal applause goes to Eric’s daughter for her kind thoughtful observation. This is only my small opinion.

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