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Iran: Jailed Lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh Ends Hunger Strike After 49 Days

Nasrin Sotoudeh, source: http://ahurai.com/social

The Iranian blogosphere is filled with joy as lawyer and prisoner of conscience Nasrin Sotoudeh has reportedly ended her hunger strike after 49 days. Multiple sources, including Kaleme website who are affiliated with the opposition Green Movement, have quoted Nasrin Sotoudeh's husband, Reza Khandan, saying that meetings with MPs and negotiations with the Iranian Parliament Speaker and Head of the Judiciary have resulted in lifting the travel ban imposed on their teenage daughter. With her demand fulfilled, Nasrin Sotoudeh ended her hunger strike.

A very proud and happy Iranian blogger, Azadi Esteghlal Edalat (meaning Freedom, Independence and Justice) writes [fa]:

Standing up against cruelty and injustice till death, and making the whole world join in her battle against the injustice that was done to her loving daughter [Mehraveh] by the regime, our dear Nasrin Sotoudeh ended her hunger strike now that legal restrictions against Mehraveh have been lifted. She taught the suffering Iranian people a lesson of hope and resistance. Nasrin Sotoudeh, the lioness of Iran, the pride of every single liberal Iranian. Happy Victory!

Artwork from Nasrin Sotoudeh support group on Facebook. The words read: “Your mere presence is the shattering of darkness.”

Azadeghi praised Nasrin Sotoudeh's courage and says [fa]:

It was the victory of an Iranian woman's will against the Taliban's regime [some Iranian activists compare the Islamic Republic to the Taliban in Afghanistan]. Nasrin Sotoudeh should know she was not alone and many Iranians supported her.

 Nasrin Sotoudeh talks about juvenile execution

In this short interview (English subtitles) Nasrin criticizes the Islamic Republic's judiciary system, and calls for the regime to stop executing prisoners under the age of 18.

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