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Egypt: Down with The Tyrant – Take Three!!

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011/12.

In what is being described as the third wave of the Egyptian revolution, Egyptians across the country and not only Cairo took to the streets again to make a strong message that they are more than willing to take down another tyrant in the making.

The calls have started following president Muhammed Mursi's announcement of the new – controversial – constitutional decree which qualifies him to become a new Middle Eastern tyrant. Egyptians are back on the streets to protest sweeping powers Mursi has granted himself. According to news reports, Mursi has neutralised the judiciary, declaring that courts will not be allowed to challenge his decisions. This has angered Egyptians, who have turned out en masse at Tahrir Square to protest what they call Egypt's new pharaoh and his Muslim Brotherhood organisation, which they say is grabbing too much power.

Although the Egyptian demand of ousting the regime still stands, Zeyad Mourad shares another request [ar]:

على فكرة : الشعب يريد توسيع الميدان

@ZeyadMourad: On a side note: The people demand to enlarge the square

The scene restored to thousands not only the image of the first wave of the revolution, but also the faith and belief of Egyptians in a free country that has been lost over the past two years. The participation of the couch party (a term that has been given to those who occupied the couches watching the news and not participating on the ground since the eruption of the revolution) as have been called, has pulled off contradicting feelings among revolutionaries. But at the end of the day, unity prevailed [ar]:

حزب الكنبة مش فلول..دول اهلى واهلك والناس اللى كانوا خايفين الثورة تخرب البلد.. هما الأغلبية فعلا ومبيتحركوش اللا للشديد القوى #Nov27

@thKool: The couch party is not part of the regime remnants. They are our families, who were pretty apprehensive about the revolution negative consequences, they remain the majority who won't mobilize unless it is a matter of life and death

Although thousands are in Tahrir to make their voices heard, the Muslim Brotherhood's (MB) IkhwanWeb decided to pull a denial blanket. They claimed:

@ikhwanweb: We support peaceful protests & strong opposition; low protesters turnout today indicates lack of support among Egyptians unlike #Jan25

For netizens it was pretty amusing to bombard the Ikhwanweb account with sarcastic comments over their way of handling the heat – literally and figuratively – as their headquarters in different Governorates were attacked and set to fire. Karl Sharo addressed them:

@KarlreMarks : you're on fire tonight. No pun intended.

While the spirits were high and pretty celebratory for the return of the life to the revolution, a few meters away the clashes of 8 days continued between protestors and the police in Simon Boulevard St. Also it has been reported that violent clashes have erupted in Mahalla between protestors and MB supporters.

Committing his predecessor mistake, the Egyptian President didn't comment on the firewall coming his way, nor addressed the nation in a commendable note. However, the president's spokesman announced that there is no turning back, and the decree is staying.

According to Ikhwanweb:

@Ikhwanweb: Prez spox: no turning back,decree is staying, those not willing to reach to a point of stability will be held accountable to God & history

Political movements and parties announced a sit-in in Tahrir until the withdrawal of the constitutional decree. And as Egyptians like to say “The Revolution Continues.” Rawah Badrawi notes:

@RawahBadrawi: I want the country to revolt against me if I don't respect the Law and Constitution.” – Muhammad Morsy (Ask and you shall receive) #tahrir

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