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Russians React to Obama's Reelection

With the American elections finally over, Barack Obama now embarks on his second term as President of the United States. Since his first campaign in 2008, Obama's top advisor on U.S.-Russia policy has been Stanford professor and democratic-transitions expert Michael McFaul, who earlier this year became America's ambassador to Russia.

Together, Obama and McFaul have pursued a “Reset” in relations with the Russian Federation. Recent events have led many observers to declare Obama's rapprochement a failure. Two watershed moments animating Obama's critics include the Kremlin-instigated closure of USAID offices in Moscow, and Vladimir Putin's assertion that the United States helped instigate street protests against Russian parliamentary and presidential elections last winter.

Vilhelm Konnander, a former president of the Swedish Society for the Study of Russia, Central and Eastern Europe, and Central Asia, as well as a Global Voices author, epitomized the Reset-skepticism in a Facebook post:

[I wonder] what Obama's reelection will mean to US-Russian relations after the failed reset policy.

In his reaction [ru] to Obama's victory, Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev expressed relief that Americans had not elected the candidate (Romney) who insisted on describing Russia as America's “number one geopolitical foe.”

President Obama meets President Medvedev at the Business Forum on July 6, 2009, White House photograph, public domain.

In far more colorful language, Russian Twitter users have weighed in on Obama's reelection with their own commentary. Here is one illustrative, and rather clamorous, exchange:

Shiitman:

А тут есть люди, которые расстраиваются, что ромни не победил?

Is there anybody here who's upset that Romney didn't win?

Smirnov:

я

I am.

Falanster

почему??

Why??

Smirnov:

много раз объяснял же. Обама это предельно мягкий курс. Нахуй он такой нужен нам в России

I've already explained many times. Obama is a complete soft-liner. We in Russia don't need a f—ing guy like that.

Falanster:

ну он же как бы умеренный соцдем, а ромни пиздец, а рашке оба как жук лапкой потрогал

Well, [Obama] is a moderate socialist democrat, whereas Romney is a f—head, but neither is something for Rasha [sic] to shake a stick at.

Smirnov:

[...] сравните администрацию Буша-мл и Обамы по отношению к Москве. ОДНО И ТОЖЕ??

[...] compare the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama by their relationships to Moscow. Are they one in the same??

Kulturtrager:

При Обаме похуизм под видом “перезагрузки”

Under Obama, “not giving a f—” [happens] under the guise of the “Reset”

In other reactions, RuNetizens focused more on what Obama's second term might mean for the future of the United States. Oleg Kozyrev condemned [ru] the American election process, specifically the Electoral College, which he implied is undemocratic. Alexander Kireev cited polling data to illustrate [ru] racial polarization in American voting behavior.

On the lighter side of things, right-wing politician Vladimir Zhirinovsky blogged that yesterday's election results do not indicate American enthusiasm for the Obama Administration, but rather mark the beginning of American's slow march toward stagnation and isolationism:

Победа нынешнего президента США обусловлена не большими ожиданиями от продолжения деятельности президента, а обычным нежеланием американцев менять устоявшиеся порядки. Они консервативны, как и все избиратели. Все боятся: а вдруг новый что-то такое начнет?

[…]

Что сейчас будет делать Барак Обама? Ничего. У него третьего срока нет – ему хочется поцарствовать 4 года, он будет кататься по заграницам, внутренние вопросы ему не решить, их вообще никому нигде нельзя решить, это надо героическое что-то произвести. Поэтому Америка сама себя обрекает на застой.

The victory of the incumbent President of the United States is not due to great expectations about the President continuing his work, but rather Americans’ reluctance to change the established order. They're conservatives, like all voters. Everyone is scared: what would something new suddenly begin?

[…]

What will Barack Obama do now? Nothing. He doesn't get a third term — he wants to rule for [another] four years, he'll travel around on trips abroad, he won't solve any domestic issues — issues that nobody anywhere can solve, short of doing something heroic. For these reasons, America dooms itself to stagnation.

  • http://twitter.com/politaire I-AM*

    Russia – too many Bond movies

    • agoodtreaty

      Or too few? :)

  • Monica Palacios

    Please, don’t say America when you just mean the United States. America is the name of a whole continent, and United States is just one of those countries.

    • JjWisniewski

      You’re right, but actually it’s two continents, South and North.

    • agoodtreaty

      Point taken, but I think it’s fairly universal to refer to the United States of America as just “America.” When someone is referring to more than the U.S., they say “North America,” and so on, as I’m sure you’re aware. Particularly in the Russian context, “Америка” only means the United States.

  • Pingback: Global Voices – Global Views on Obama’s Re-election | Occupy KC Journal Blog

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