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Egypt: Advice to Protesting Kuwaitis

As Kuwaitis embarked on their largest ever protest to denounce changes to the electoral law, passed by the country's hereditary ruler while the Parliament was dissolved, Egyptians kept themselves busy on Twitter, dishing advice to them on what to do and not to do.

Samah Anwar tackles the dress code of Kuwaiti men, who wear a long flowing gown called a thobe. She tweets [ar]:

لبس الجلبيات ده مينفعش خالص ف الثورات

@samahanwar: Wearing a thobe is not suitable for revolutions

In another tweet, she uses reason:

ماتجبوش الخراب لبلدكم انتو عايشين كويس واحمدو ربنا غيركم مش لاقي العيش

@samahanwar: Don't destroy your country. You are living well. Thank God for your blessings. Other people aren't able to live

Many Egyptians echoed similar sentiments. Ebrahim Elkhadm writes [ar]:

#نصيحة_مصرية_للكوايته.. تبقوا ولاد مره لو سمعتوا كلامنا .. ده احنا اساسا معرفناش ننصح نفسنا بلا هبل

@ebrahimelkhadm: You would be losers if you listen to us. We don't even know how to advice ourselves. Let's not be stupid

Elshazli adds:

ركزوا فى كل كلمة مكتوبة فى الهاشتاج دا واعملوا عكسها هتلاقوا ثورتكم نجحت

@El_Shazli: Focus on every word written under this hash tag and do its opposition. You will discover that your revolution has become a success

Egyptians advise protesting Kuwaitis on Twitter

Egyptians advise protesting Kuwaitis on Twitter. Kuwaiti Naser AlMufarrij shares this screenshot on Twitter


And Kuwaiti Naser AlMufarrij shares this screenshot of a tweet, which reads in Arabic:

Why would you have a revolution when the youngest child amongst you is richer than an Egyptian minister?

Many Egyptians used the opportunity to joke about their own revolution, like Gepril Thuwaiba who tweets:

قبل ما تتحركوا المره اللى جايه كل واحد يتفق مع صحابه ..بعد المسيره مفيش كلام ولا جدال والا الفراق

@Gepril1: Before you take to the streets next time, everyone should agree with his friends. After the march, don't talk, argue and part ways

And he adds:

هما ثلاث خطابات لو حصل مبروك عليكوا متنسوناش بعد الفرحه الكبيره كام برميل كده ع الماشى احسن الحاله ضنك

@Gepril1: There are only three speeches [in reference to Mubarak's three speeches before leaving power]. If that happens, then congratulations! After your big celebration, don't forget us. Remember us with a few barrels [of oil] as our circumstances are dire

Kuwaitis were also quick to point out that the protests in Kuwait were just that – protests and not a revolution. Barcelonya explains:

دي مش ثورة دا احتجاج يا اخوانا

@Barcelonya: This isn't a revolution. It is a protest.

But Mona Abo Elyazeed is adamant in her advice and shares one thought:

@MonaAbo: no compromise

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