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Egypt: Egyptians Give Advice to Syrians

This post is part of our special coverage Syria Protests 2011.

Egyptians are dishing out advice to Syrians – on Twitter. Under a dedicated hash tag, the advice ranges from “do not take photographs with tanks” to “take advice from someone else.” The move follows news from Damascus this afternoon that three of Syrian president's inner circle have been killed in a bomb blast in Damascus. They include the Defense Minister, whose successor has since been named.

Yousry Salama notes:

#نصيحة_المصريين_للسوريين‬‏ اوعوا تتصوروا جنب دبابة
@MYousrySalama: Do not take photographs with tanks

Ibrahim Elgarhi advices:

#نصيحة_المصريين_للسوريين‬‏ خدوا نصايح من اي حد غيرنا
@Ibrahim_Elgarhi: Take advice from someone else

Esraa Mahfouz has more:

#نصيحة_المصريين_للسوريين‬‏ وصيتكم بقى بزوجة بشار .. تتدفن معاه ..مش تسيبوها حرة زى ناس هبل اعرفهم

@esraamahfouz: Don't forget Bashar's wife. She should be buried with him. Do not leave her free and do what some idiots I know have done

And on a serious note, Salma Mubarak tweets:

@PiercedMajesty: Do not expect the struggle to be over in a year & a half, do not expect it to be perfect, do not give up & whine.

Many netizens tried to reason why the hash tag was created.

Mamdouh Jalal explains:

#نصيحة_المصريين_للسوريين‬‏ أصلا نصائحنا دي سخرية من نفسنا… لأن أصلا ثوار سوريا شايلين سلاح وبيحرروا أرضهم، مش زينا قاعدين على تويتر

@FinalRule: This hash tag pokes fun at us really … because in reality Syria's rebels are carrying arms and are freeing their land and not like us sitting on Twitter

Israa Elsakka shares a similar sentiment:

@IsraaElsakaa: this hashtag in which Egyptians advice Syrians …shows how Egyptians r frustrated.”peaceful revolutions” r naive

Egyptians were the second to oust their dictator this so-called Arab Spring, when the got rid of Hosni Mubarak's 32-year reign in February 2011. The Tunisians were the first. Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, who ruled Tunisia with an iron fist for 23 years, fled to Saudi Arabia in January 2011. The Libyans rid themselves of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's 40-year reign in October 2011. And the Yemenis saw the back of Ali Abdulla Saleh in January 2012, after he granted himself immunity from prosecution for crimes he committed during his 33-year rule. Should the Syrians succeed in toppling Al Assad and his Baath regime, they will be Arab country number five to score a victory.

This post is part of our special coverage Syria Protests 2011.

The thumbnail image used in this post is a screenshot from a video uploaded on July 18, 2012 by Youtube user aldoghem.

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