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Uganda: Kony 2012 Video Response From Ugandan Prime Minister

This post is part of our special coverage Kony 2012.

Uganda’s Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi has taken to YouTube to respond to a viral video campaign launched by Invisible Children to raise support for the arrest of wanted war criminal Joseph Kony. Contrary to what the video says, Mbabazi argues that Joseph Kony is not in Uganda and that the country is not in conflict.

The video by Invisible Children has received criticism from Ugandan netizens.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ye5X9Xdg2CE

Mbabazi's video has attracted over 100 comments. Below are some interesting comments from YouTube users:

jordsa01 says:

there are so many good organizations in Uganda doing so much good. Basically, the Prime Minister is saying give your money to organizations that actually do something. like Watoto Childrens Villages (watoto.com) that focus on the future of Uganda, rather than emotionally bringing up old problems. thank you for this response!

Some netizens think oil has got to do with 2012 campaign.

Mrfreeworld1000 argues:

Just days after oil was discovered in Uganda Obama suddenly declares he will protect the Ugandans from the LRA, which doesn't even exist. It's quite clear that the US government had a lot to do with the Invisible Children movement suddenly going viral

sebek23b writes:

they found oil recently in Uganda so we need military peace mission to take down bad guy and we need to take “care” of oil in order to ensure that bad guy doesn't profit from it.

However, juansayblue thinks Kony 2012 campaign has nothing to do with oil or even Kony:

Uganda Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi. Photo source: @amamambabazi.

The hole “Kony 2012″ video had nothing to do with oil or Kony. It just had to do with money for invisible children. They knew ppl would donate and that Kony was gone so they made those boxes you had to BUY. All just a big scam for Invisible Children to take your money

So is OddOpinion:

@sebek23b Invisible Children was around way longer than the knowledge of that oil.

Other netizens like soundbeans turned their criticism to Uganda's government:

Mbabazi the problems of Uganda is all caused by corruption in your government.

marksturgeon writes:

Terribly produced attempted propaganda. If the Uganda ministers wanted Kony arrrested, Kony would have been in prison a long time ago. Uganda denies basic human rights and promoted segregation of races and the most violent homophobia in any state. The foreign office advises to “Avoid all travel to part(s) of country”

Ugacentricity notes that Invisible Children's intentions may have been good, but…:

No doubt, Jason's intentions MAY have been good, but he threw truth and fact out in favour of drama and innuendo. True, he may not have got the 100 million+ viewers, but the end doesn't always justify the means. As a Ugandan who was affected by Kony, I'd rather have had 100 people listening to the truth in my story than 100 million believing the untruths in it.

mixmatchofficial observes that Kony 2012 video is not about Uganda:

the Kony 2012 video is NOT about uganda. it is about Kony. the video DOES make a point to say that Uganda is NOT in conflict any more as it demonstrated by showing Jacob and other Ugandan residents being freed and coming to America. the point of the video is to raise money to develop tracking systems and aid the ugandan army to hunt Kony elsewhere in Africa. this is a classic political response to save face on the side of Uganda, but in no way does it diminish the importance of the IC mission

hpnuevo agrees:

@mixmatchofficial
you said it right mate..its not about Uganda to make things clear..Its about a notorious Ugandan national named Joseph Kony.

MrSmhhc8 wonders why no one is calling attention to atrocities taking place in the US:

There is nothing wrong with wanting to help rid the world of evil like Kony, the problem is that many people will blindly trust everything they see in a well made video and not do any further research. There are unspeakable atrocities going on every day south of the U.S. border or for that matter, in our own country, that you don't hear anyone calling to action about.

AlgerianMAZB thinks Kony 2012 campaign is a bit misguided:

I respect what the “invisible children” charity have been trying to achieve but let not forget that things far worse have been happening & are still happening in the world today. Palestine, Syria, Afghanistan etc. This is something that the Uganda government feels they can control so let them control it. The last thing the Uganda people need is US Soldiers flying in to steal their oil. Again i'm not saying that what the charity is doing is wrong. They're just a bit misguided

Some African netizens critical of the video decided to tweet about “what they love about Africa” with the hash tag #WhatILoveAboutAfrica.

This post is part of our special coverage Kony 2012.

  • Rachel

    @mixmatchofficial
    The only correct response I’ve seen in all these replys.
    Keep in mind this is one of many invisible children videos. Each of which display the growth and recolonization and peace that is in N. Uganda. Kony is a Ugandan. That’s why “Uganda” is brought up so much. ALL IC media and blogs indicate that they are working in DRC &CAR where the effects of the LRA are much more visible and current.
    Kony 2012 was expected to be seen by 500,000 people. Not the 100m who it’s reached. If you don’t agree with it, make a difference in the world your own way instead of spreading negativity about what other people are ACTUALLY and ACTIVELY doing.

    @MrSmhhc8
    Agreed. There are similar and probably worse problems world wide. Even in the states. If that’s what you’re passionate about, do something about it. Start your own revolution. Seems lazy to knock an organization without giving reference or resolution to what you mentioned.

    @juansayblue
    Scam?…they offer the same “propaganda” for free on a PDF file from their site. It’s clearly not ALL about money. Only a complete idiot would think that any organization, non profit or for profit could be run without income or donations or purchases. IC is a true GRASSROOTS movement. This is displayed in their early media. Even veteran NFP’s like salvation army and red cross and make a wish get donations and have events to fund raise.

    If you don’t like invisible children, focus your energy (or lack of energy) on doing something you do like or believe in. It’s rather pathetic to bash radical people who ARE making a difference while you’re sitting online looking for ways to give your negative 2 cents.

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  • james buchanan

    this is not journalism. I don’t care what youtubers think. They bring up some interesting points, but I want facts.

  • Pingback: Video Highlights: Culture, Human Rights, Online Activism and Crowdfunding · Global Voices

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