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Venezuela: World Meeting of Body Art Takes Over Caracas

The Sixth World Meeting of Body Art took place this year in Caracas, and some of its most striking expressions were shared online through citizen media. Among these creations, body art by indigenous people of Venezuela played an important role.

Photographer Camilo Delgado Castilla wrote in Demotix:

From 17 to November 20 the Sixth Meeting of Body Art [was held] in the city of Caracas, with the participation of 18 countries: Australia, Austria, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, USA, Spain, Japan, Luxembourg, Italy, Mexico, Poland, South Africa, New Zealand and Venezuela.

Body painting, tattoos, body modifications, lectures, movies, piercing, Indian painting, dance, ritual suspension, origami dresses were at the meeting with the human body as its centerpiece.

"A woman from a Venezuelan indigenous community paints the arm of a spectator." by Camilo Delgado Castilla, copyright Demotix

"A woman from a Venezuelan indigenous community has her face painted", by Camilo Delgado Castilla, copyright Demotix

"A woman from a Venezuelan indigenous community paints the face of a spectator" by Camilo Delgado Castilla, coypright Demotix

Also, Manuel Enrique's Flickr photostream shows interesting views on the festival and the artists’ works:

Archangel Blue, by Manuel Enrique. Used with permission

Through citizen videos like this one by Luar Aleman, we can take a look at some of the different art forms presented in the festival:

Also, thanks to Caracas Musical we can see some of the exhibitions:

You can see images of previous body art meetings held in Caracas through Demotix image galleries by Camilo Delgado Castilla (September 2008; October 15, 16 and 17, 2010) and Nelson González Leal (October 2010).

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