Close

Donate today to keep Global Voices strong!

Our global community of volunteers work hard every day to bring you the world's underreported stories -- but we can't do it without your help. Support our editors, technology, and advocacy campaigns with a donation to Global Voices!

Donate now

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

USA: October 15 on the Streets and Social Networks

This post is part of our special coverage #Occupy Worldwide.

It's no secret that Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, among other social networks, have played a key role in the recent local and global protests. In 2009, the world found out the details of the green wave in Teheran thanks to these platforms, and the same happened in Tahrir Square in Cairo and with the “indignados” in Madrid. As was expected, the global protests of October 15, 2011, also thoroughly used these networks.

October 15 saw an endless flow of hashtags on Twitter, including #ocuppyWallStreet, #OWS, #globalday, #15oct, #Oct15, and #occupyeverywhere, amongst others, making a call to all who wished to join. At the moment when the protest was taking place in Times Square, hundreds of thousands of people used their smartphones to tweet or record everything that was going on, and Global Voices was no exception, as is shown in the following video:

Bloggers didn't let this phenomenon pass by unnoticed. Jennifer Preston of Media Decoder, shows video samples of the protests throughout the world and offers figures of the networks usage compared to the demonstrations:

The online conversation about Occupy Wall Street grew steadily on social media platforms in recent weeks and increased among users abroad in the last week as the global demonstrations approached. According to Trendrr, a social media analysis company, the number of posts about Occupy Wall Street on Twitter outside the United States grew to more than 25 percent of total posts on Friday, up from 15 percent during the same period the week before.

(Please read more of Global Voices’ stories on Occupy Wall Street here and here).

Protests did not only take place on squares and parks, but also on the Internet. There is a blog called “We are the 99 Percent”, which shows pictures of people holding signs with details on their economic problems. The blog Democracy in America doesn't only think of this blog as praiseworthy, but also measures the differences between Facebook and Twitter regarding the impact of their messages:

Facebook fans aren't much of a guide to anything, since you can become one and then forget about it entirely. Tweets are slightly better, as they indicate how many people are aware of an event while it's going on. But they indicate only awareness, not support. And it's hard to work out the overall trend of the past few days because people have been moving from the #occupywallst hashtag to the shorter #ows

And that's how we collected reports on Twitter of the events of October 15. DC Debbie (@DCDebbie) used the hashtag #ows to explain why an American news outlet seems to be against the protesters:

Fox News wants to portray the #ows crowd as directionless, ignorant slackers. That's why they'll NEVER air this video: http://www.observer.com/2011/10/exclusive-occupy-wall-street-activist-slams-fox-news-anchor-in-un-aired-interview-video/

A short while ago, President Barack Obama declared, on the opening of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, that the deceased leader would have backed up the October 15 movement if he was alive. Nevertheless, Liza Sabater asks (@blogdiva):

but does he really? #ows RT @thaiparampil: Obama: MLK Jr. Would Have Supported Occupy Wall Street | RealClearPolitics http://is.gd

Harakahdaily's tweet (@hdaily09) is an example of how social networks are used in a developing story:

Occupy Wall Street protests continue worldwide as 175 arrested in US: LONDON, Oct 17: Inspired by the Occupy Wall… http://dlvr.it/qzsdz

Following are pictures of the October 15 protests in New York City, which took place from Zuccotti Park to Times Square:

Se generaron ciertos roces entre fuerzas de la autoridad y la prensa en Times Square. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Some clashes between law enforcement forces and the press in Times Square. Picture by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

La policía trataba de controlar el paso de los transeúntes. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Police trying to control access to pedestrians. Picture by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Los manifestantes se agruparon en pleno corazón de Times Square. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Protesters gathered at the heart of Times Square. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

El flujo de la marcha no cesaba, aun con la presencia policial. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

The protest flow didn't stop even with police presence. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Pancarta con el número "15" en alusión a las marchas del 15 de octubre. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Sign with the number "15" in reference to October 15th protests. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Pancarta bajo la reseña "Traigan el dinero de las guerras a casa". Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Sign saying "Bring our war money home". Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

A medida que transcurría la marcha, se hacía más notable el roce policial con los manifestantes. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

As the protest developed, the tensions between policemen and protesters grew. Picture by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Manifestantes pasando por el índice de Nasdaq en Times Square. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Protesters passing in front of the Nasdaq index in Times Square. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Entre tanto, algunos manifestantes de Occupy Wall Street seguían ubicados en el Zuccotti Park. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Meanwhile, some Occupy Wall Street protesters stayed at Zuccotti Park. Picture by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Mujeres disfrazadas de zombies formaban parte de la manifestación. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Women disguised as zombies took part of the protest. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Hasta los niños formaron parte de la marcha. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Even kids joined the protest. Picture by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

En Zucotti Park, también conocido como Liberty Park, se ubicaron centros de higiene y de comidas. Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

In Zucotti Park, also know now as Liberty Park, sanitation and food centers were placed. Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

Manifestante con una máscara de oveja y una pancarta que lee "Ovejas del mundo, despierten". Foto de Robert Valencia para Global Voices, 2011

Protester with a sheep mask and a sign that says "Sheep of the world, awake". Photo by Robert Valencia for Global Voices, 2011

This post is part of our special coverage #Occupy Worldwide.

Featured image of Occupy protest in Times Square by Stephanie Keith, copyright Demotix (15/10/11).

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site