Close

Donate today to keep Global Voices strong!

Our global community of volunteers work hard every day to bring you the world's underreported stories -- but we can't do it without your help. Support our editors, technology, and advocacy campaigns with a donation to Global Voices!

Donate now

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

South Sudan: Messages of #LoveFromSudan

This post is part of our special coverage South Sudan Referendum 2011.

On the eve of the independence of South Sudan, a group of young Sudanese started a movement that is trying to start a conversation between North and South to create mutual friendship between both sides and link young citizens of the two countries.

Mo Elzubeir is the main person behind the #lovefromsudan videos, audio and Twitter messages and is very active in promoting friendship and relationship between Sudan and South Sudan.

He wrote:

With the official birth of the new nation that was once a part of Sudan, many of us feel heartbroken. Not because of the rich resources that are now gone (and there is plenty of that). We are heartbroken because a part of us, a culture, a people, many peoples, have gone their own way.

But the truth is, I have nothing but love for the people of South Sudan. I wish them the best in their new nation. I wish for them to prosper and cherish the freedom they have fought and struggled for.

This is an open call to any Sudanese who would like to send a message of love to our brothers and sisters of South Sudan. A video and/or audio message of no more than 10 seconds from as many as possible to put together to show our support for the people of South Sudan.

Below are two video clips, A Love Letter to South Sudan and With Love From Sudan, that #loveFromSudan youth group made and several tweets about #love from sudan:

With Love From Sudan Initiative:


#LoveFrom Sudan – A Love Letter From Sudan
:

#LoveFromSudan Tweets:

@cpaschyn
:

#LoveFromSudan – A message of hope from North Sudan, on South Sudan's independence day. http://fb.me/10vyg0PO4

@elzubeir:

#LoveFromSudan should hopefully spin off and result in people realizing that with loss comes a new opportunity to appreciate what we have.

@HanaOsman:

Wow! mashallah seems the #LoveFromSudan video might hit 1000 views in less than 24 hours very soon … well done team! http://ow.ly/5Az0D

@bechhamilton:

And my blog shoutout to #LoveFromSudan here: http://t.co/CQejmMP #2Sudans

@MImzMimz:

#LoveFromSudan – A Love Letter to South Sudan http://t.co/BffBDXc

@simsimt:

LoveFromSudan wasn't exclusively about showing love. Semantics doesn't matter. It was more about respect of choice and bidding good wishes.


@Cameroon_Com
:

#LoveFromSudan: A Love Letter to South Sudan http://t.co/r344h9P via @elzubeir! Hope the politians would watch & listen to their people!:)

@leighleighsf:

Congrats South Sudan! The world's newest country (#193) & Africa's 54th state, http://t.co/K7jLA85 The #LoveFromSudan tweets are inspiring.

@elzubeir:

Enough about us though. I hope the people of #SouthSudan break the African trend and build their new nation without fighting. #LoveFromSudan

This post is part of our special coverage South Sudan Referendum 2011.

  • Manzoor H. Sarkar

    Very nice post . It’s a nice gesture from the young people of the North Sudan conveying such well-wish messages to their counterparts in the South . It’s an wonderful exception and very rare & unusual under what prevailing in this intolerant world . It’s a proper way of separating with one’s friends and compatriots peacefully & dignified when they can’t live together in one country . May be this separation will bring them better understanding and mutual appreciation of each other in the future and these messages will send clear signals to the politicians to refrain from any future engagement in war and instead to walk in the way of mutual talks and reconciliation.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site