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Global Voices Podcast 1: Who do we believe online?

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Hello World!

It’s not easy to summarise what is happening with Global Voices writers and communities worldwide in a half-hour podcast, but we’re going to try and bring you a handy audio version reflecting the flavour of our writers, editors and themes. I'll be hassling people for audio from all the corners of the Global Voices universe. In this first episode, we hear about…

Global Voices Podcast 1: Who do we believe online? by globalvoices

Question markWhat to believe on the internet

Both bloggers and the media were fooled in June 2011 by hoaxer Tom MacMaster who pretended to be “Amina” a lesbian blogger in Syria. The Gay Girl in Damascus incident made us all think about how we read and verify blogs. Jillian York, volunteer representative to the Board and author on the Middle East and North Africa team, Aparna Ray, a South Asia author and Tarek Amr covering Egypt joined me in a lively discussion.

Bandim dancersSounds of Guinea Bissau

Eddie Avila, director of Rising Voices brought home audio from his recent visit to Guinea Bissau in West Africa. Tune in for some musical entertainment from Bandim and Enterramento, neighborhoods that are famous for their dance troupes, and to hear Eddie’s thoughts on a new youth blogging community there established with support from Rising Voices.

Firuzeh Shokooh ValleWhat's it like to be a Global Voices editor?

To finish up our first edition, I took a moment to chat with our Spanish Language Editor, Firuzeh Shokooh Valle who juggles her part time Global Voices work alongside motherhood, teaching and studying for a Phd. What is it like to cover places like Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Spain for Global Voices? Firuzeh told me what she enjoys about her work.

Tell us what you'd like to hear next time

That’s all we could fit into the first edition of the reboot. But the podcast is bound to grow and evolve as we keep working on it. I’d like to hear more from you about what you think and what you would like to hear – that way I can start chasing down our editors and writers to share more with us to listen to in each episode.

Making the podcast is a lot of fun and a fair amount of work. The cool thing is – I get to work with so many amazing people worldwide who are willing to give their time, go out and record wonderful things and put up with my constant demands for more audio. Each tiny clip was recorded by different people around the globe – that’s not a bad journey for just under thirty minutes.

Music credits

In the podcast you can hear lots of lovely Creative Commons music. If you want to find out more about these artists here are the links for you. Thanks to Orb Gettarr for the atmospheric Return of the Atlanteans Lemurian Candidate, to Mark Cotton for his Spiritualized Homage, to Superbus feat. NS for Fujjad! Most of the music was found via OpSound.Org, The Free Music Archive or directly from the artists. Thanks also to all of the utterly wonderful voiceover performances and clips that help to glue the podcast together.

Thanks for listening and I look forward to sharing the next Global Voices podcast!

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  • http://jza.me JZA

    Usually people assume and categorized their news source as a verified issue. But is interesting to see what had happened in the UK where the scandal from NewsCorp broke out and you start wondering how most of these sources are just rebroadcaster to the Reuteurs cable.
    Things like Wikileaks have also impact on the integration from news and knowing how local knews are usually handled in my area. There is no garanteed that news are always objective.
    On the blog, is true that there might not be much garanteed however the wikipedia “law” of self regulation as weak at seems for most people, is usually something that has proven to work.
    However people and bloggers are not inmune to schemes and tainted visions projected by their governments. I suggest to always get multiple sources and not just asume one view.

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