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Libya: Mourning Mohammed Nabbous

This post is part of our special coverage Libya Uprising 2011.

Tweeps, journalists and viewers around the Middle East and the world are mourning the death of Mohammed Nabbous, founder of Libya's AlHurra TV.

According the multiple press reports, Nabbous was killed in a firefight while he was filming. He leaves behind a wife and an unborn child.

Known as “Mo” to his many fans, Nabbous brought the Muammar Al Gaddafi's violent crackdown of protesters home to viewers and listeners around the world. From his AlHurra TV livestream and during taped conversations with a variety of international media, he spoke candidly about the situation from his base in Benghazi.

Here is one of Nabbous's first webcasts from the Libyan uprising, which has been curated by apologiiiize, where he states that the Libyan people want to live in Freedom without Gaddafi. In response to a question about what the international community can do, Nabbous responds:

For God's sake, who can rule for over 42 years. Isn't that enough? Ask him to stop killing us. I don't know how you people can watch him killing us without putting any pressure on him. That is the minimum we ask that we live in freedom.

Nabbous was also known for his bravery in the field, getting close to fighting and explosions to provide an unfiltered view of the Gaddafi regime's violence. Here is a video of Nabbous attempting to get close to a explosion at the Benghazi power station. Commenting on the heat, he said: “I will try to get closer. I hope my camera is not gonna die…It is really hot, I think my camera is melting.”

This phone call, during very heavy fighting in Benghazi, is reportedly his last.

Tributes
As news of his death spread, he was mourned by fans and journalists alike. His wife, speaking a few hours after Nabbous passed, demanded his work carry on.

“I am Mo's wife, and I want to let all of you know that Mohammed has passed away for this cause,” begins the report at 3:15 PM Libyan time.

“He died for this cause and let's hope that Libya will become free. Thank you everyone. Please pray for him. And let's not stop doing what we are doing until this is over. What he started has got to go on no matter what happens…I need everyone to do just as much as they can.”

A tribute from the Al Jazeera English journalist who blogs at Bilal in Doha, said Nabbous's mission was “to get the news about what’s happening in #Libya out to the world.”

We often followed him, using his info and news in our reporting. Today, when attacks were reported in Benghazi, I was tuned in to his livestream for hours – at some point this morning he said that he was not afraid to die. And in one his first video’s that I saw, he said:

“I am not afraid to die, I am afraid to lose the battle.”

All day, everyday, we report on deaths around the world – a week ago, when Al Jazeera cameraman was killed in Libya, it forced us to pause for a moment cos the loss was closer to home. With Mo’s death, even though I’ve never met him, I feel like its a loss of someone I knew…

Let us honor this courageous man and help him realize his dream by directing our efforts to get news from Libya out.

Many people expressed their sorrow on the Libya Feb 17 Livestream chat page:

marylouise996S: Thank you Mo for all you have done – you put us on the ground – you let the world know what was happening. I hope you can see that planes are in the air. You are a hero to all Libya and to the world

Here is a roundup of Twitter condolences.

@afauno: Mohamed Al Nabbous is dead: When voice of freedom loses life, voice of army speaks. The world still needs work.

@acarvin: Mohammad Nabbous was my primary contact in Libya, and the face of Libyan citizen journalism. And now he's dead, killed in a firefight.

@OmarAlmu5tar: Founder of Libya Alhurra TV in Benghazi, Muhammad Nabbous, has been shot and martyred today. Allah yar7ama #Libya #feb17

@Toward_Khilafah: Mohamed #Nabbous, 28 was martyred 2day. A true Libyan man, in the mould of Omar Al-Mukhtar. #Libya

@ChangeInLibya: “I am not afraid to die, I am afraid to lose the battle” – Mohammed Nabbous, Benghazi martyr today. Omar Al-Mukhtar would be proud. #libya

@Koreman: http://twitpic.com/4b137e – This is very emotional. Mohame Nabbous widow is talking live now. http://bit.ly/fj1J6O

@RRowleyTucson: Let's drop the word citizen from citizen journalist. Mohammad Nabbous was a journalist who died in the line of duty He was #Libya's Cronkite

@RRowleyTucson: Mohamed #Nabbous, full month after his 1st broadcast (Feb19), killed on the front lines to defend his city, Benghazi, & his country. #Libya

@Douuu: RESPECT to all the martyrs we've lost .. Mohamed Al-Nabbous, may u RIP .. your death is honourable & definitely not in vain. #Libya

@LibyaInMe: I really can't bare reading Mohammed Nabbous's name, over and over again. It hurts a lot. My heart can't take it anymore #libya #feb17

@TrendsmapCanada: ‘sarkozy', ‘nabbous’ & #uscagm are now trending in Canada http://trendsmap.com/ca

@mdp4202: Apparently a well respected journalist, Mohammed Nabbous, was shot & killed earlier today in Benghazi. Deepest respect 4 all trying 2 inform

@PurpleGimp: Don't know if all #Tweeps know this about Mohamed ‘Mo’ Nabbous @MoAm84 but his Radio Station in #Benghazi was 1st EVER Free Radio in #Libya.

@jeffjarvis: When journalists ask what citizen journalists risk their lives covering news, introduce them to Mohammad Nabbous. http://on.fb.me/gTp0XT

@Cyberela: “@TamyEmmaPepin “I am not afraid to die, I am afraid to lose the battle” – Mo Nabbous, young citizen journalist. killed in Benghazi #Libya”

@MoussaBashir: Libya: Mohammed “Mo” Al Nabbous, founder of Benghazi webcast “Libya Alhurra TV” killed in firefight http://t.co/WJLxoxg

@rj_gallagher: MUST WATCH: Killed Libyan reporter Mohamed Nabbous this morning: “He is bombing #Benghazi…he has to be stopped” http://3.ly/hdVN #Libya

@Donna_West: We have lost the voice of the ppl of #Libya. Mo Nabbous was killed by gunfire earlier today. RIP Mo. Thank you for keeping us informed.

@johanwicklen: Mohammad Nabbous R.I.P

@MrVop: Mohammed Nabbous, the founder of Libya AlHurra TV, was killed this morning while reporting on the attacks from the pro-Gaddafi forces

Ron Eastwood: This Morning, Ghaddafi's dogs killed my friend Mohammad Nabbous in Benghazi. RIP Brother.

@peppezlyk: R.I.P Mohammad Nabbous

Guy Noyfb: ‎'Truther’ “Mo” dies in a firefight!

Julia Hines: THE LINK BELOW IS AN EXTERNAL LINK TO SHOW YOU EXACTLY WHAT THEY ARE DOING. It Is Genocide http://tinyurl.com/5wuorrj SHOW THE World what THE BASTARDS ARE DOING

@acarvin: And now I can't stop thinking, what if those French planes began to arrive 12 hours ago. Would Mo be alive now? I just don't know.

@justamira: LISTENing to Mohammed Nabbous’ audio when he was killed: http://bit.ly/h4tphZ RIP Mohammed: You are a TRUE HERO! #Libya

@afauno: Mohamed Al Nabbous is dead: When voice of freedom loses life, voice of army speaks. The world still needs work. http://twitpic.com/4b2f01

Mostafa Libya: Mohammed Nabbous the Founder of the famed “Libya Alhurra” Got shot in the head while protecting his city of Benghazi…. RIP Martyr :'(

Barbara Rice: Over the past few days I have been observing a webcam channel sponsored by the Libya17Feb folks and in particular the citizen journalism of a young married Libyan man named Muhammad Nabbous. “Mo” as he is nicknamed, has been an inspiration to many Libyans across North America, Europe, and the Middle

Finally, we have a conversation with Mohammed Nabbous and Ben Wedeman from CNN talking about Gaddafi, hallucinogens and the Libyan people.

This post is part of our special coverage Libya Uprising 2011.

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