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Iran: Protests and Repression

Tehran protests, via jomhour.info

Tehran protests, via jomhour.info

Hundreds of thousands of Iranians in Tehran and several other cities have rallied to support presidential candidate Mir Hussein Mousavi, defying a government ban on demonstrations. Protesters are calling for the annulment of the presidential election results, saying President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad‘s victory in the 12th of June election is a fraud. Security forces have struck down hard on demonstrators, and at least one person was killed in Tehran today.

Although Twitter, Facebook and YouTube are currently blocked in Iran, many Iranians have been using proxies to bypass filters and report up-to-the-minute news. Iranian authorities have also blocked SMS text messages, and are also filtering several news websites reflecting reformist opinions.

Iran09 tweeted earlier today:

“I confirm that there's a Basij [Islamist militia] station around the square and they shot ppl from the roof. #iranelection”

Jadi tweeted:

“People are still joining to the demonstration. Chanting ‘Mousavi! Mousavi! Take back my vote’ #IranElection”

Mousavi spoke and called for the election results to be reviewed. He said he is ready to take part in a new election. There are some video news clips about the election here.

As protest grows so does repression

Students who protested against the presidential election at diffrent universities were attacked by security forces. Here is a video film showing a dormitory of the University of Tehran on Sunday night.

Update: Here is a Flickr slideshow of photos showing more of the destruction left behind by security forces in University of Tehran dormitories on Sunday night. According to the Flickr user, Agha Hadi, many students were jailed.

Below, is a film showing an Iranian woman taking on security forces by a bus stop.

Azarmehr comments on this film:

Look at this brave Iranian lioness, first she swing kicks and then she side kicks the neanderthal truncheon wielding riot guard! She gets a few baton strikes but this is the price for freedom and she cares not.Blessed is our motherland Iran, for having such daughters. The fear is gone and the momentum continues.

Thanks to Tehranlive we have several photos of Iranian people's protest and resistance movement:

repress1

Green Vote tweeted [fa] that one of people's slogan is, ‘Don't be afraid, we are all together'. Green Vote also tweeted that Mohammad Ali Tarekh, a student activist, was arrested in Shiraz.

Several bloggers such as Zeitoon report [fa] that people chant Allah-0-Akbar (God is Greater) from their houses during the night. Mousavi asked people to chant Allah-o-Akbar from the rooftops of their homes. During 1978-79 Islamic Revolution people use to do the same as a protest move against Shah.

Where is Obama?

View from Iran, an American blogger, writes:

Ultimately, I know that rhetoric is just rhetoric. That the words of a president do not actually change history even though they become part of it. If ever there was a time for Obama to turn on his rhetorical charm, it is now. Today at 4 pm there will be demonstrations in 20 cities in Iran. My friends *want to be on the streets.* They are parents, civil servants, accountants, receptionists, and yes students. In the end, with all of the violence, I am not sure that they will show up.
So Obama, turn on your charm. Use your powers of rhetoric to tell Iranians that, while we won't be sending in the marines, our hearts are with you. I know you can do a better job than I can.

Isfahan's suffering

Tehran is not the only city where people protesting have been repressed. Protesters in Isfahan, have also been the targets of security forces.

Iranevents has published several photos of Iranian protests.

People are being chased by security forces here:

isfahan2

and here:

isfahan3

  • Anne Logue

    What can we do here in the US? We are all watching.

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  • ella

    Hamid

    We read tweeter, some of us protest. There were DOS attacks on some websites in Iran. Some people wore green (MOusavi colour) to work to support Iranians.
    But MSM do not do much to help.
    It was only after people on tweeter flooded CNN and other stations with requests to cover what is going on in Iran they started to (cautiously) report.
    And what about al Jazeera? Her reporting is even worse than other stations.
    Really, MSM should cover more. People are working and there are so many things to do that they have only time to watch a little news. And that’s all.

    As for “where is Obama.”
    I think it was many people who told US not to butt in. That you (meaning Iranians) want to do your own thing and that otherwise government would call you a westoxicated and a traitors to revolution. And that they would have a problems. And in other ME countries they told US (more or less)the same. And many US people agreed. And Obama agreed. And you want US government to change its behaviour now. After you told Bush &Co., to go to hell?
    I am not American but I understand (a little) why US and Obama do not do much.

    • Freedom Forall

      we still want the U.S. and the west in general to stay out, what gave you the idea that the Iranians want Obama or for that matter any one else to do any thing?
      It is ONLY the Iranians who can demand change and have to gain their freedom.
      The Iraqis did not gain freedom and democracy by the U.S.removing Saddom Hussein nor did the people in Afghanistan.
      History showes us that western interference has always been to protect their own interest and no one elses.

    • sonny o. mason

      Yes, i have been glued to cnn for any news coming out of iran. Where are the people’s guns? Do they have nothing to protect themselves with other that clubs and fire? How can anyone stand a chance of survivng the heavy artillery that only the gov. has? my prayers are with all of the women whoseek equality. Neda represents that for all women on this planet!!

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  • Osama Mvhammad

    First of all , I want to thang the educated and young people who strived for their rights. I think these demonstrators are not only interested in giving back their votes and send the reformist Mousavi on throne, but also they want to question the credibility of the unelected Supreme Leader and the Council of Experts who are responsible of determination of good and bad aspects for their suffurin people. The people at 1979 rovolted against the endless power of Shah and the dictatorship, but now we can see that the results of such a revolution have not take the right path, for instead of former dictators one could see many false elected one as well as unelected leaders. The will of people and especiall the “Green” supporters is much more powerful than the will of group of peoplewho has already “Lost a Game” as described by the former president Ahmdi Najad_ one cannot say the current president since his dministration and the entire regime is under the the challenge of its validity.

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  • http://boxologies.blogspot.com/ boxthejack

    Anne, Avaaz.org have a petition you could sign. They have a good track record of global grassroots mobilisation. http://www.avaaz.org/en/for_the_people_of_iran/?cl=254566267&v=3493

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