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The Movie “Da Vinci Code” in South East Asia

As the movie “Da Vinci Code” starts its run across South East Asia, there have been protests and calls by Christian groups asking the governments to ban the movie. In Philippines, the capital City of Manila went ahead with the ban.

Yvette on her MySpace blog is disappointed with the decision

I can't hide my disappointment when I hear stupid things like this. Amidst all the bigger issues the Church could be undertaking in the Philippines – such as helping the poor or taking a stance on corruption rather than being a part of it – it chooses to make airwaves by banning a measly movie based on fiction with Tom Hanks sporting a bad haircut.

Lucia Lai in Malaysia is happy that the movie is being shown in Malaysia

In fact i am very happy that this movie was allowed to be shown, and i wished and wished that no church bodies or organisations would come out to say this movie should be banned. i want the movie to be shown and i want the world to see the reaction of christians.

In Thailand, it was initially announced that the last 10 minutes of the movie would be censored because of protests by Thai Christian groups. Later the film authorities allowed the movie to be shown in its entirity.

Andrew Biggs in Thailand says

Yesterday it was announced that the final ten minutes of the Da Vinci Code would not be cut. Hooray! This is a victory for common sense.
According to the Nation this morning, the movie company will hand out clarification messages with all tickets sold. This is a much better idea, isn’t it? We can educate people, and teach them to think for themselves, instead of banning something outright.

Update: The blogger at Unspun: Deciphering Indonesia emailed us about the totally contrasting attitude in Indonesia where the Bishops Conference of Indonesia (KWI) is not asking for a ban.

The KWI’s decision is based on its assumption that Catholics in Indonesia are mature enough and that forbidding them to watch the movie would only increase their desire. One wonders what goes on in the minds of those of the Vatican.

You’d have thought that they had learned something about the Principle of Scarcity from the days when Adam and Eve were romping around Eden.

  • learner

    “Ending Human Bankruptcy”an idea whose time has come.

  • http://www.hot-screensaver.com Neo

    Heard that the movie is not so good as compared to the book version? Anyway, myself have yet to catch the movie, so not much comment at the moment.

  • http://www.tharum.info ThaRum

    I read the book months ago, and think it is a good read. A couple of days ago I went to a used-book store in town, and found out about the movie. I did not buy as it is not DVD-quality.

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