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Quick Reads + Uruguay

Media archive · 205 posts

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Latest stories from Quick Reads + Uruguay

Uruguay Becomes First Country to Legalize Marijuana Market

Uruguay's Senate voted 16 to 13 to legalize the production and sale of marijuana. President Mujica is expected to sign the law, which would become effective starting next year.

I'm in favor of legalizing marijuana, but it would be great to make headlines around the world because of our security and education.

Ignacio de los Reyes, the BBC's Argentina and Southern Cone correspondent, tweeted on December 10:

Stay tuned for more citizen reactions.

16 Books on Latin American Street Art

In Latin America, street art is of major cultural relevance. The region’s traditions of social movements and revolution have allowed the form to give voice to otherwise unheard sectors of the population. Of course, not all street art is politically or socially-oriented in content, but it does often provide insight into specific objectives and ideals.

Nick MacWilliam from Sounds and Colours browsed the online store Amazon “to see what’s readily available for those who are interested in the subject of street art in Latin America.” He recommends 16 books on the subject, covering Haiti, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, Colombia, Mexico, Argentina and more.

Declaration on the Future of Internet Cooperation

Representatives of the organizations that manage the technical infrastructure of the Internet meeting in Montevideo,  Uruguay, have released a Declaration on the future of Internet cooperation [es], in which they analyze the problems currently affecting the future of the Internet.

Among other things, they mention the importance of globally consistent Internet operations and warn against the fragmentation of the Internet at a national level, while expressing their concern about the global decrease in confidence of Internet users due to the recent revelations of monitoring and surveillance.

This can, in some way, be considered as a response to proposals that go in that direction, such as that recently advanced by the president of Brazil, Dilma Roussef, before the UN and to the activities of the NSA.

Praise and Criticism for Uruguay's Proposed Media Law

The bill, which has received the praise of several journalism and freedom of expression organizations, is not as controversial as the one recently approved in Ecuador or as contentious as the one currently in the hands of Argentina’s Supreme Court.

However, it is not without its critics. While it has been lauded for its intention to set limits to media concentration and guarantee spaces for independent content, critics say some of its provisions are broad, ambiguous and overreaching.

Travis Knoll provides an overview of Uruguay’s proposed media law in The Knight Center's Journalism in the Americas blog.

ABRE LATAM: Open Data Unconference

Fernando Briano from Picando Código informs [es] about the upcoming unconference ABRE LATAM [es], organized by D.A.T.A. [es] and Ciudadano Inteligente [es], on June 24 and 25 in Montevideo, Uruguay. The event hopes to “bring together representatives of different sectors of Latin American civil society who work with Open Data on issues like transparency, citizen participation and the extension of civil liberties.” You can follow them on Twitter [es] and Facebook [es].

#FLISOL 2013: Hundreds of Latin Americans Installing Free Software

Flisol 2013 Banner.

Flisol 2013 Banner.

From the Patagonia to Havana, hundreds of computer users across Latin America are choosing freedom over control by installing free software on their computers. On April 27th, groups of free software enthusiasts will be installing free software in dozens of cities across Latin America as part of FLISOL [es], the Latin American free software installation festival.
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Developing Latin America: A Summary

dal-anca
Desarrollando América Latina (Developing Latin America) has published a video summary of the regional hackathon DAL 2012, where 400 participants and 70 social experts developed 80 applications. Here [es] you can see Global Voices’ coverage of the event.

Uruguay Moves Towards Marriage Equality

On April 2, 2013, the Uruguayan Senate voted 23 to 8 to legalize same-sex marriage. The bill also raises the minimum age for marriage to 16. The bill will now go back to the lower house, which is set to vote on the Senate's amendments this month. El Telégrafo shares a Storify post [es] with related news and reactions.

“Palestine in the Heart” of a Uruguayan Activist

Uruguayan activist and journalist María Landi shares her reports on Palestine in her blog Palestina en el corazón [es] (Palestine in the heart). Radio Mundo Real [es] recently interviewed Landi on current events in Palestine.

Uruguay Has South America's Fastest Net

Not that long ago, I'd never thought I could report this, but here we are. According to Netindex, Uruguay is the country with the fastest average speed in Latin America, with 9,53Mbps, and that places us 57 at a global level, over Chile (58), Mexico (71) and Brazil (75).

The blog Tan conectados (Como valientes) [es] announces Uruguay's new position in the region and analyzes what's behind this achievement. However, it also mentions that “even as leaders in the region and moving closer to those 50 first places, we are far below the average global speed of 13,07Mbps”.

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