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Exhibition in Taiwan: Monument for the Self-immolated Tibetans

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An oil painting exhibition, Monument for the Self-immolated Tibetans, is being held in Taipei Liberty Square. The portraits of the self-immolated Tibetans are drawn by Beijing artist, Liu Yi based on Tibetan writer Woeser's reports. The exhibition is opened between May 1 and May 20.

Taiwan's Sunflower Movement on Reddit

Four Taiwanese students joining the Sunflower Movement opened an Ask Me Anything on Reddit to answer questions regarding their protest against the closed-door trade deal with China.

A Slogan on March 8 Anti-Nuke Protest in Taiwan

Anti nuke protest in March 8 2014. Photo taken by Facebook user Mr. Magic Lai.

Anti nuke protest in March 8 2014. Photo taken by Facebook user Mr. Magic Lai.

In the anti-nuke protest on March 8, 2014, a demonstrator promoting marriage equality held a sign saying: “Why can 23 millions citizens in Taiwan decide whether we can get married and why cannot the same 23 millions people decide whether we want the fourth nuclear power plant or not?” The LGBT community demanded legislation to allow same sex marriage, but the second read of the bill on marriage equality was delayed because the leading legislators said it was too controversial. The demonstrator use the same government logic to challenge its position on Nuke 4.

Podcast: Taiwan

Sinica Podcast held a discussion about Taiwan from their personal experiences. The discussion explores Taiwanese's personal identity, their culture, media situation, health care system, as well as Taiwan's political relations with the mainland.

Taiwan: Virgin Mary With an Aboriginal Face Tattoo

The statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary with golden facial tattoo based on the Atayal people's tradition. Photo taken by Octopus (章魚)

The statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary with facial tattoo based on the Atayal people's tradition. Photo taken by Octopus (章魚). Non-commercial use.

An Atayal woman with the traditional facial tattoo held her granddaughter. Photo taken by atonny.

An Atayal woman with the traditional facial tattoo held her granddaughter. Photo taken by atonny.Non-commercial use.

When Italian Catholic Father Alberto Papa came to Taiwan in 1963, he learned that face tattoo is an important culture for many aboriginal tribes in Taiwan. For example, in Atayal culture, only respectable person would have face tattoo. To deliver the idea that Virgin Mary is a holy figure, the father decided to add a golden face tattoo on the statue of Virgin Mary in his church.

More photos showing Taiwan aboriginal women with face tattoo can be found here.

Call to Stop Construction to Protect the Leopard Cats in Taiwan

A small leopard cat. Photo is taken by the Wildlife First Aid Station and reprinted by leopardcatgo. CC BY-NC 2.0

A small leopard cat. Photo is taken by the Wildlife First Aid Station and reprinted by leopardcatgo.

Leopard cat is listed as a vulnerable species [zh] in Taiwan. Since the big cats live in the forests and jungles in both plains and in hilly areas and their home range is very broad, their habitats in Taiwan are easily disturbed by new construction projects. The Taiwanese environmental evaluation committee had temporally rejected the request from the Miaoli Government to develop an alternative road in Miaoli across the habitat of leopard cats on April 16 2014 after a round of protests and petition. However, this development project was not dropped, and more development projects in this area are coming up. A facebook page [zh] was set up so people who want to protect the leopard cats in Taiwan can be well informed and mobilized.

Taiwan #CongressOccupied: Wild Lily Turns into Sunflower

The Wild Lily is still the symbol to support the new-generation student movements that fight for democracy. Photo from Susan Bomin. CC: NC.

Wild Lily is still the symbol to support the new-generation student democracy movements. Photo from Susan Bomin. CC: NC.

The sunflower sent from the protesters inside the Legislation Yuan. Photo from Christine Hepburn. CC: NC.

A flower shop owner delivered sunflowers to the protesters inside the Legislation Yuan. Photo from Christine Hepburn. CC: NC.

The Wild Lily student movement took place in March 16 1990 at Freedom Square in Taipei is the most significant historical event that marks the democratic struggle in Taiwan. As a result of the movement, temporary provisions effective during the period of Communist rebellion in Taiwan was terminated and the Taiwanese congress was reformed in 1991.

Twenty-four years have been passed, in March 18 2014, another student movement took place in the Legislation Yuan in Taiwan. The students protest against the government’s black box process of the trade deal between Taiwan and China. On the third day of the demonstration, the media starts calling the action Sunflower student movement when a flower shop owner delivered sunflowers to the protesters [zh] as a form of support. The image of sun reflects people's hope to shed light to the black-box free trade negotiation between Taiwan and China governments.

A warning message sent to Taiwan from Ukraine

The decision Russia made to send military force to Crimea worries many Taiwanese. Taiwan Explore, a blogger who devoted to introducing Taiwan, explained the parallels between Taiwan and Ukraine and why many Taiwanese feel worried about themselves when they watch the news about Ukraine these days.

Taiwan: Protest Against Legislation on Marriage Equality

The Legislative Yuan in Taiwan passed the first reading of the “marriage equality“ bill [zh] on Oct 25, 2013. On Nov 30, more than 300000 people protested against this bill, in particular against the proposal on same-sex marriage. J. Michael Cole, a Taipei-based freelance journalist, described what he observed in this protest in his blog.

Comics Comparing Hong Kong and Taiwan Society

Kevin Tang from Hong Wrong translated a series of comics depicting the differences between Hong Kong and Taiwan by a Hong Kong-based Taiwanese artist JIEJIEHK. Below is one of the comparison that vividly shows the difference between the restaurant services in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Restaurant service in Taiwan and Hong Kong by JieJieHK via Hong Wrong.

Restaurant service in Taiwan and Hong Kong by JieJieHK via Hong Wrong.

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