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Documentary ‘Too Black To Be French’ Wants to Start an Honest Conversation on Race in France

Screen capture of the trailer of the documentary "Too black to be French"

Screen capture of the trailer of the documentary “Too black to Be French”

Too Black to Be French” is a documentary made by Isabelle Boni-Claverie, a French-Ivorian writer and filmmaker. Boni-Claverie's goal is to provide unexplored ideas and start a conversation on French society's inequalities and discrimination.

The documentary includes commentary and analyses from renowned Francophone thinkers such as Eric Fassin, Pap Ndiaye, Achille Mbembe, Patrick Simon and Eric Chalaye, along with testimonies from anonymous people of color. Some of the main arguments in the documentary are the conspicuous lack of minorities in the public media sphere, the lack of acknowledgment of colonial history in the fabric of the nation and the absence of quantitative data on discrimination at the workplace.

The documentary ignited a trending hashtag #TuSaisQueTesNoirEnFranceQuand (Translation: You know you are black in France when…) on Francophone social media.

Podcast: China's Leftover Women

Sinica Podcast invites Leta Hong Fincher, author of “Leftover Women“, a book about the state of women's rights and gender equality in modern China. 

The podcast discusses hidden problems and obstacles that Chinese women are facing in society including domestic violence and the “leftover women” issue. 

It's worth noting that according to the author, state media's propaganda, family-driven values and legal customs in things like the housing market “all effectively conspire to roll back much of the progress on gender equality China has made over the last twenty years.”

 

The Africanized Experience of Lisbon

The media and racial stereotypes [pt], through the perspective and experience of two specialists in the area of the study of race, both Afroportuguese, born in Lisbon, Portugal. is the topic of a new podcast. An interview with Grada Kilomba, academic of Santomean origin at the Humboldt University Berlin, translated into Portuguese in the first program of Radio AfroLis, touches on the nature of racism in Europe.

The role of the media, of black and white in the struggle against racism is also analyzed in this program by the researcher in the area of religious studies and white studies, Elisabete Cátia Suzana, University of Uppsala (Sweden).

Radio Afrolis presents itself as an “africanized experience of Lisbon” that intends to “reveal facets of an emerging black consciousness in Portugal”

Para alguns afrodescendentes a cidade de Lisboa é claramente a sua cidade. Para outros Lisboa é uma cidade como outra qualquer, apesar de terem nascido ou de sempre terem vivido nela. Outros há que rejeitam Lisboa porque sentem que não é o seu lugar.

No caso dos afrodescendentes negros, a questão da pertença relaciona-se com a sua fraca representação nos media, assim como em espaços sociais diversificados, mas principalmente, com o racismo. E surge a questão: Eu como negro ou negra, africano, africana devo/ posso/quero assumir-me como lisboeta? E serão precisamente as inúmeras combinações de respostas que vamos apresentar nos episódios do nossos podcast.

Acompanhem-nos por serem afrodescententes, por interesse na temática, pela vontade de conhecer outras vivências de Lisboa, ou até mesmo por quererem acrescentar algo à discussão!

For some of African descent the city of Lisbon is clearly their city. For others Lisbon is a city like any other, in spite of being born there or having always lived there. Others reject Lisbon because they feel it is not their place.

In the case of African-descended black people, the question of belonging relates to their poor representation in the media, as well as in other kinds of social spaces, but principally, it relates to racism. The question arises: as a black person, African, should I/can I/do I want to assert by identity as a Lisbonite? It will be precisely the numerous combinations of responses that we will present in the episodes of our podcast.

Follow along as African-descended Portuguese, or because you are interested in the topic, wanting to get to know other experiences of Lisbon, or even because you'd like to add something to the discussion!

Follow on FacebookSoundcloud and the blog radioafrolis.com.

New Global Voices Podcast in Portuguese

GV podcastThe prolific team of Global Voices in Portuguese have launched a new monthly podcast, Vozes Globais, with alternative news gleaned from the internet in all Portuguese speaking countries.

Portuguese journalist Vanessa Rodrigues (@lunacronica) is heading up the podcast in partnership with community radio station RadioManobras.pt. The goal is to partner with community radios in more Portuguese language countries to see the show re-broadcast internationally.

The idea for the podcast was born at a #GVMeetup event in Porto, Portugal in December 2013. For more information on the podcast or other activities of Global Voices’ Portuguese language teams, please contact Sara Moreira.

Podcast: Bo Xilai's Trial

Sinica hosts Ed Wong from the New York Times and James Miles of The Economist for a closer look at Bo Xilai's trial. The podcast discusses media transparency in China and historical comparisons with previous political purges, including the famous case against Jiang Qing and the Gang of Four during the Cultural Revolution.

India's ‘Paradoxical’ Right To Property

In a podcast at mylaw.net legal practitioner Namita Wahi talked about the paradox of the fundamental right to property in the Indian Constitution and how to deal with it.

Oral History Of The Indian Constitution

Rohit De at ‘Law And Other Things’ informs that journalist, blogger and writer Sidin Vadukut has uploaded a series of podcasts on the oral history of the Indian constitution, beginning with the reforms of 1858.

Global Voices Podcast Wins Top Ranking in European Podcast Award

The Global Voices Podcast produced by Jamillah Knowles in London was named the United Kingdom winner in the non-profit category of the 2011 European Podcast Awards. Hundreds of podcasts from 11 countries in four categories were nominated.

Sao Tome and Principe: Community Radio Takes Advantage of Social Media

Somos Todos Primos (We are all cousins) [pt] is the name of an online community radio whose first letters are a clue to the country it refers to: São Tomé and Príncipe. Both its Facebook page and Ning network have a lot of activity from listeners.

Sounds of the European Podcast Award

The European Podcast Award has its own podcast featuring winners and nominees. The podcast is produced by Karin Høgh from Denmark and Dave Thackeray from the UK. The Global Voices Podcast is is one of more than 1,500 shows nominated (voting ends November 30).

Talking Heads Project Showcases What is Extraordinary About People in Africa

Talking Heads is a project of the Africa Centre, a non-profit cultural organisation based in Cape Town, South Africa. Talking Heads produces audio casts and short films, which are freely available on YouTube and iTunes:

The Africa Centre has designed an approach that identifies, showcases and creates opportunities for African “Thought Leaders”. Talking Heads profiles some of the extraordinary Africans making a meaningful and affirmative contribution to their communities, cities, countries, to the Continent and the world. Our approach provides a model that can be easily replicated anywhere in Africa and, with scale, may offer an alternative narrative of who and what we know about our Continent.

Podcast: History of the Internet in China

Sinaca Podcast discusses how the Internet has grown and changed China with three guests who have experienced the worst and the best of the Chinese Internet: Duncan Clark from BDA China, Gady Epstein from The Economist, and Bill Bishop, the author of the Sinocism newsletter.

Podcast: Taiwan

Sinica Podcast held a discussion about Taiwan from their personal experiences. The discussion explores Taiwanese's personal identity, their culture, media situation, health care system, as well as Taiwan's political relations with the mainland.

Podcast: Contemporary Art in China

Sinica podcast discusses contemporary art scene in China, including what it means to be a Chinese artist in today's China and how different things have changed in the past 20 years. 

Podcast:China-Africa Relations Through Social Media

The China in Africa Podcast discusses how social media is influencing China's engagement in Africa.

Podcast: China's Apple Attack

Sinica discusses and analyzes the Chinese state media's two-week attack on Apple's service policy as part of a campaign for Chinese consumers.

Saudi Arabia: Brownies and Kalashnikovs

Mideast Youth's Rola Khayyat posts a podcast featuring an interview with the Saudi author of Brownies and Kalashnikovs Fadia Basrawi.

Latin America: Energy Podcasts in English

Setty recommends the Institute of the Americas’ English-language podcast series on energy in Latin America.

Collecting Audio of UN Human Rights Declaration in 370 Languages

United_Sounds on SoundCloud is compiling the largest collection of audio recordings of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in more than 370 languages. If you speak a language they don't yet have, you can submit an audio recording – the UN has probably already translated, you just have to read it out loud.

Kenya: Kenyan Poet Podcasts

Kenyan poet invites readers to her new project, KenyanPodcast: “Hi, for those who were on twitter yesterday, I announced about my pilot podcast; the first in many to come which seeks to bring the blog to life for the followers to have something they can take away with them and listen to.”

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