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Have you Ever Shared a Football Match with Cows? Some Peruvian Fans Did

Imagen en Flickr del usuario grahamjpierce (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

Image on Flickr by user grahamjpierce (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

The Peru Tournament is a promotional football event where several teams from all around the country take part, aiming pass to first and second divisions. The champion earns a place in first division and the runner-up moves forward to second.

On a match played on August 10 during 2014 tournament between Minsa FBC and Expreso Inambari in the Peruvian departmento of Madre de Dios, several cows interrumpted the game. This unsual incident shows the pitiful condition of an event that doesn't have the most elementary safety measures, which is especially regrettable in a country where football is king of sports, in spite of the poor results.

Twitter users couldn't wait to express themselves:

Cows interrumpt a Peru Tournament match LOL!

On our way to World Cup. Unheard of: cows invade the field during a Peru Tournament match.

Bovines invade field on Peru Tournament. On this case, “the team is still alive” has literal meaning.

Journalist Henry Panduro posted a video on YouTube:

Reasons to Cheer for the Ivory Coast in the World Cup

CostadeMarfil

Ivory Coast's national team during the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Image from Flickr user Merah Chhaya. CC BY 2.0.

On the website LaMula.pe, Juan Carlos Urtecho explains his reasons for supporting the Ivory Coast in the World Cup match with Colombia on Thursday, June 19:

Desde que les ganaron a Japón en su debut, los marfileños se han vuelto mis preferidos en este mundial. [...] Uno escoge a sus engreídos de la manera más simple. Costa de Marfil, ubicado en la costa occidental de África, con un PBI de 19 mil millones de euros y un per cápita de 967 euros es el tercer país más pobre de los que están en el mundial después de Honduras y Bosnia. La economía de Japón (PBI de 5 billones de euros y 30 mil per cápita) es la segunda detrás de Estados Unidos. Costa de Marfil es un país que intenta recuperarse de una sangrienta guerra civil que dejó a decenas de miles de muertos y cientos de miles de desplazados entre el 2002 y el 2007. Japón, es… bueno, Japón.

From the moment they defeated Japan in their debut, the Ivorians became my favorite team in this World Cup. [...] You choose the spoiled ones via the simplest way. Ivory Coast, located in West Africa, with a GDP of 19 million euros and a per capita of 967 euros is the third poorest country that takes part in the World Cup, after Honduras and Bosnia. Japan's economy (GDP 5 billion euros and 30 million per capita) is the second after the United States. Ivory Coast is a country struggling to recover after a bloody civil war that resulted in ten of thousands dead and hundreds of thousands displaced between 2002 and 2007. Japan, is… well, it's Japan.

BookCrossing in Latin America

Silvana Aquino writes [es] on Infotecarios about BookCrossing, BC, the practice of leaving a book in a public place to be picked up and read by others, who then do likewise.

BC has become a an increasingly popular phenomenon, as right now there are two millions of registered users, known as BookCrossers, who have released about tne million books in 132 countries. Through these free books that go beyond barriers of time and space, the intention is to turn the world into a global library.

And then, Silvana tells us a Latin American experience:

So, there is the B Day [es] with the aim of “atttracting attentios about books circulating as objects, as idea carriers, as cultural assets, this is the main idea of this proposed action.” This practice is carried out every September 21 since 2010 in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru [es] and year by year, more countries from other regions have started to participate.

The post reviewed here was part of the first #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 5, 2014.

Prison Literature

From a very young age he had a very big urge and devoted himself to well known works and trades such as becoming friends with what he didn't own, but he was also very clever, smart and extremely aggressive, but with highly defined principles towards shyness and respect for chlldren and women and our parents. He never allowed himself to witness any kind of abuse, although sharpness emerged from each of his pores as well as the urge of winning no matter how, but without violating his principles.

On blog Manofalsa there are [es] some narrations by the “prisoners of the Carquín Prison in Huacho (Peru) during the Workshop of Awareness to Creative Reading and Writing” on April. The quoted narration is titled Mosca [es] (roughly translated as Clever).

The post reviewed here was part of the first #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 5, 2014, submitted by @Cyberjuan

Libraries in Lima

Silvana Aquino writes [es] on Infotecarios about the launching of Lima Literary Map. She explains the initiative:

Some weeks ago, the Downtown Lima Literary Map [es] was presented. This is a project developed by researchers Kristel Best and Renzo Farje and sponsored by the Peruvian House of Literature, that tracks literary and cultural traces in Downtown Lima, encompassing symbolic places (absent and current) from the 1930s up to date.

Silvana, as good librarian, was interested by the presence of libraries in the map, detected 11 of them and adds:

All these libraries, besides their strategic location, their architecture, their valuable colections, their services and cultural activities offer offer us the chance of go deep into the literary and cultural world -past and present- of the city. So next time you go Historic Downtown, don't miss the chance of some #biblioturismo [book tourism].

The post reviewed here was part of the first #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 5, 2014.

The Inca Road Is a New World Heritage Site

QhapaqÑam

Somewhere in the Qhapaq Ñam. Photo on Flickr by user Rainbowasi. CC BY-SA 2.0

For the first time in the 40 years of World Heritage convention, six countries united to submit a joint application to designate a cultural site as world heritage. Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru requested that the Incan Road be included as a cultural heritage site.

The announcement was made in the 38th session of the World Heritage Committee in in Doha, Qatar.

The international body highlighted that the Inca Road “represents a very valuable shared legacy, almost 60,000 kilometers long”:

Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru share a new cultural legacy site: #QhapaqÑan, Inca road system. Congratulations!

Peru: Love Is… New Ways of Surprising Your Girlfriend

He had it all planned to surprise his girlfriend on her birthday giving her a huge teddy bear, but a transportation strike made him walk [es] more than four miles (seven kilometers) carrying along the gigantic present.

This is the happy ending story of Jonatan Rosas, from the district of Yanacancha, in the Peruvian city of Pasco. The incident didn't go unnoticed on Twitter:

IS THIS LOVE? He walked 7 kilometers (4m 61 yards) with a huge teddy bear to give his girlfriend a present PERÚ.- Jonatan Rosas, who lives in…

Jonatan Rosas had to walk carrying along the heavy present for his girlfiend due to the transportation strike…

Jonatan Rosas took a sacrificed walk carrying a heavy 1.60 m (5'2″) teddy bear due to…

We Have to be Prepared for Children's Questions

On Mamacitas, there are reflections [es] about the experience mothers have when it comes to sex questions from their children:

Comprehensive sex education can't start at 15 years old, it's too late by then. It's a contradiction that we want to protect our children from every danger and that we don't understand that this part of their education is fundamental for their well being, their safety and for building today the healthy sexuality for tomorrow. Finally, it's necessary to note that this is a gradual process that starts with a good answer to the question “where do babies come from.”

The post reviewed here was part of the second #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 12, 2014.

Wiring the Amazon

On an articles published on The New York Times, Michael Kleinman talks about his video produced for Op-Docs titled “Wiring the Amazon”, where he shares the four-year struggle to get a remote Peruvian village connected with the outside world:

I was following the work of One Laptop per Child (O.L.P.C.), a United States-based nonprofit that has designed inexpensive laptops for primary education. The organization is particularly active in Peru, where the government has purchased and distributed hundreds of thousands of O.L.P.C.'s laptops to its poorest communities. One such village is Palestina, deep in the Amazon rain forest. It has only 65 people.

[...]

I spent three months over the course of a year in Palestina. During that time, I documented the approximately two dozen laptops given to the primary school students, as well as a solar-powered satellite dish that provided wireless Internet access to the village. While there was no formal electrical grid in Palestina, most households had small car batteries charged by solar panels. At night, the schoolchildren charged their computers using these batteries..

Op-Docs is the editorial department’s section for short, opinionated documentaries, produced by independent filmmakers and artists with wide creative latitude, covering current affairs, contemporary life and historical subjects.

International Community and the Crisis in Ukraine

Angie Ramos guest blogs [es] at Tintero Político about the crisis in Ukraine and after analyzing different key factors involved concludes with the reaction of the internacional community:

The thing is, the international community, facing cases like this one, acts subjectively as it depends on the magnitude of the interests involved to support or express rejection to some interventionism in various countries. Is it that some countries have privileges for the international community? For instance, in the case of the conflict between Great Britain and Argentina regarding Falkland Islands, a referendum carried out on the population, where 98% of the population voted for staying under Great Britain's administration, received support, while in Crimea, there is no will for acknowleding the legality of the process.

The post reviewed here was part of the second #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blog on GV] on May 12, 2014.

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