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Hometown Through the Eyes of Its Children

Imagen en Flickr del usuario  iñaki de luis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

Image on Flickr by user iñaki de luis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

Chapacoco, a Peruvian village located at an altitude of 3,000 meters, part of the district of Chilcaymarca in the Arequipean province of Castilla, has been in the news thanks to its children.

On October 10, 2014, the book “Chapacoco as seen from the children” was launched. The book has been written by fifth and sixth graders from the Elementary School 40351. Under the guide of their teacher Ronny Durand, in charge of the project “Making science as a game”, the students investigated for over a year about customs and riches of the area:

El libro resulta de Proyecto de Innovación Pedagógica “Haciendo Ciencia Como Jugando”, que tiene como objetivo que los niños desarrollen competencias y capacidades utilizando el conocimiento de la realidad, promoviendo la identidad cultural, la conciencia ambiental y la participación comunitaria. Resultado de esta es que la obra contiene: los datos generales (ubicación, población, servicios y geografía); costumbres y tradiciones, como mitos, cuentos y leyendas; la gastronomía, artesanía, paisajes turísticos y restos arqueológicos del lugar; y la riqueza natural de la flora y fauna.

The book results from the Educational Innovation Project “Making science as a game”, that has as an objective that children develop competences and abilities using knowledge from reality, promoting cultural identity, environmental awareness and community participation. As a result, the book has general information (location, population, services and geography); customs and traditions, such as myths, tales and legends; gastronomy, craftwork, tourist landscapes and archeological remains; and the natural riches of flora and fauna.

An NGO in Peru Feeds Pelicans to Prevent Them From Starving

Pelícanos blancos. Foto en Flickr del usuario  jacinta lluch valero (CC BY-SA 2.0).

White pelicans. Photo on Flickr by user jacinta lluch valero (CC BY-SA 2.0).

At the estuary of Moche river in the northern Peruvian province of Trujillo, members of the NGO Corazones Bondadosos (Generous Hearts) fed more than 400 pelicans with fresh fish to prevent their starvation.

Collective ‘Corazones Bondadosos’ (Generous Hearts) feeds pelicans in Trujillo. Noble gesture. They ask authorities to support them.

Dead pelicans are a health hazard.

In late August, about 120 dead pelicans were buried at the beach Las Delicias, located in the same area. They were buried six feet under the sand and then covered with lime to prevent potential illnesses.

The Inca Road Is a New World Heritage Site

QhapaqÑam

Somewhere in the Qhapaq Ñam. Photo on Flickr by user Rainbowasi. CC BY-SA 2.0

For the first time in the 40 years of World Heritage convention, six countries united to submit a joint application to designate a cultural site as world heritage. Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru requested that the Incan Road be included as a cultural heritage site.

The announcement was made in the 38th session of the World Heritage Committee in in Doha, Qatar.

The international body highlighted that the Inca Road “represents a very valuable shared legacy, almost 60,000 kilometers long”:

Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru share a new cultural legacy site: #QhapaqÑan, Inca road system. Congratulations!

Peru: Love Is… New Ways of Surprising Your Girlfriend

He had it all planned to surprise his girlfriend on her birthday giving her a huge teddy bear, but a transportation strike made him walk [es] more than four miles (seven kilometers) carrying along the gigantic present.

This is the happy ending story of Jonatan Rosas, from the district of Yanacancha, in the Peruvian city of Pasco. The incident didn't go unnoticed on Twitter:

IS THIS LOVE? He walked 7 kilometers (4m 61 yards) with a huge teddy bear to give his girlfriend a present PERÚ.- Jonatan Rosas, who lives in…

Jonatan Rosas had to walk carrying along the heavy present for his girlfiend due to the transportation strike…

Jonatan Rosas took a sacrificed walk carrying a heavy 1.60 m (5'2″) teddy bear due to…

We Have to be Prepared for Children's Questions

On Mamacitas, there are reflections [es] about the experience mothers have when it comes to sex questions from their children:

Comprehensive sex education can't start at 15 years old, it's too late by then. It's a contradiction that we want to protect our children from every danger and that we don't understand that this part of their education is fundamental for their well being, their safety and for building today the healthy sexuality for tomorrow. Finally, it's necessary to note that this is a gradual process that starts with a good answer to the question “where do babies come from.”

The post reviewed here was part of the second #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 12, 2014.

Peruvian Amazon Faces Cold Temperatures: Consequences of Climate Change

Imagen en flickr del usuario @Christianhold (CC BY 2.0).

Image on flickr by usuario @Christianhold (CC BY 2.0).

Peruvian journalist and writer Paco Bardales, comments with other colleagues the waves of cold weather, or friajes, that recently affected usually hot Iquitos. These weather phenomena have gone from sporadic, as the group remembers from their childhood, to more frequent and longer lasting, so much that the state agency Meteorology and Hydrology Service (Senahmi, according to its name in Spanish) has decided to issue cold weather alerts for the cities located in Peruvian Amazonic regions. On the conversation, the group reflects that these frsots are due to climate change. Is this so? No doubt about it. Man has influenced in this change, and even Andean and Amazon communities are not to blame, they suffer from floodings, diseases, and all other consequence affecting their health and environment.

El impacto de la contaminación y los daños al ambiente sin duda han ido afectando las temperaturas. El Perú es considerado como uno de los países más vulnerables ante los impactos del cambio climático. Según estimaciones del MEF, los posibles daños económicos causados por este aspecto podrían llegar hasta los diez mil millones de dólares de aquí al año 2025.

The impact on contamination and damages to environment have undoubtedly been affecting temperatures. Peru is considered one of the most vulnerables countries to the impact of climate change. According to tne Ministry of Economy estimates, potential economic damages caused due to these changes could reach ten thousand million US dollars from now to year 2025.

National and international entites aim to create awareness and inform. One of the main actions are workshops about Conference of the Parties about about Climate Change (COP-20). And as Paco says:

La preocupación resulta importante, pues, al fin y al cabo, la Amazonía será fundamental en la mitigación del cambio climático. Ojalá no sea tarde para nosotros mismos.

Concern becomes important, as, after all, the Amazon region will be fundamental on mitigating climate change. Hopefully, it's not too late for ourselves.

Have you Ever Shared a Football Match with Cows? Some Peruvian Fans Did

Imagen en Flickr del usuario grahamjpierce (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

Image on Flickr by user grahamjpierce (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

The Peru Tournament is a promotional football event where several teams from all around the country take part, aiming pass to first and second divisions. The champion earns a place in first division and the runner-up moves forward to second.

On a match played on August 10 during 2014 tournament between Minsa FBC and Expreso Inambari in the Peruvian departmento of Madre de Dios, several cows interrumpted the game. This unsual incident shows the pitiful condition of an event that doesn't have the most elementary safety measures, which is especially regrettable in a country where football is king of sports, in spite of the poor results.

Twitter users couldn't wait to express themselves:

Cows interrumpt a Peru Tournament match LOL!

On our way to World Cup. Unheard of: cows invade the field during a Peru Tournament match.

Bovines invade field on Peru Tournament. On this case, “the team is still alive” has literal meaning.

Journalist Henry Panduro posted a video on YouTube:

Reasons to Cheer for the Ivory Coast in the World Cup

CostadeMarfil

Ivory Coast's national team during the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Image from Flickr user Merah Chhaya. CC BY 2.0.

On the website LaMula.pe, Juan Carlos Urtecho explains his reasons for supporting the Ivory Coast in the World Cup match with Colombia on Thursday, June 19:

Desde que les ganaron a Japón en su debut, los marfileños se han vuelto mis preferidos en este mundial. [...] Uno escoge a sus engreídos de la manera más simple. Costa de Marfil, ubicado en la costa occidental de África, con un PBI de 19 mil millones de euros y un per cápita de 967 euros es el tercer país más pobre de los que están en el mundial después de Honduras y Bosnia. La economía de Japón (PBI de 5 billones de euros y 30 mil per cápita) es la segunda detrás de Estados Unidos. Costa de Marfil es un país que intenta recuperarse de una sangrienta guerra civil que dejó a decenas de miles de muertos y cientos de miles de desplazados entre el 2002 y el 2007. Japón, es… bueno, Japón.

From the moment they defeated Japan in their debut, the Ivorians became my favorite team in this World Cup. [...] You choose the spoiled ones via the simplest way. Ivory Coast, located in West Africa, with a GDP of 19 million euros and a per capita of 967 euros is the third poorest country that takes part in the World Cup, after Honduras and Bosnia. Japan's economy (GDP 5 billion euros and 30 million per capita) is the second after the United States. Ivory Coast is a country struggling to recover after a bloody civil war that resulted in ten of thousands dead and hundreds of thousands displaced between 2002 and 2007. Japan, is… well, it's Japan.

BookCrossing in Latin America

Silvana Aquino writes [es] on Infotecarios about BookCrossing, BC, the practice of leaving a book in a public place to be picked up and read by others, who then do likewise.

BC has become a an increasingly popular phenomenon, as right now there are two millions of registered users, known as BookCrossers, who have released about tne million books in 132 countries. Through these free books that go beyond barriers of time and space, the intention is to turn the world into a global library.

And then, Silvana tells us a Latin American experience:

So, there is the B Day [es] with the aim of “atttracting attentios about books circulating as objects, as idea carriers, as cultural assets, this is the main idea of this proposed action.” This practice is carried out every September 21 since 2010 in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru [es] and year by year, more countries from other regions have started to participate.

The post reviewed here was part of the first #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 5, 2014.

Prison Literature

From a very young age he had a very big urge and devoted himself to well known works and trades such as becoming friends with what he didn't own, but he was also very clever, smart and extremely aggressive, but with highly defined principles towards shyness and respect for chlldren and women and our parents. He never allowed himself to witness any kind of abuse, although sharpness emerged from each of his pores as well as the urge of winning no matter how, but without violating his principles.

On blog Manofalsa there are [es] some narrations by the “prisoners of the Carquín Prison in Huacho (Peru) during the Workshop of Awareness to Creative Reading and Writing” on April. The quoted narration is titled Mosca [es] (roughly translated as Clever).

The post reviewed here was part of the first #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on May 5, 2014, submitted by @Cyberjuan

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