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Music Collective Beirut Open Stage Launches Online Platform

BOS cover Photo

“To further its vision of showcasing and promoting as best as it can the local talent”, the Musical Collective “Beirut Open Stage” has launched its online platform.

Their new website, which compliments their YouTube channel, allows live viewing of performances as well as staying up to date with their latest events and spotlights. Aspiring artists can also apply and have their talent recognized by the ever-growing community that is Lebanon’s crazy artists.

Beirut Open Stage has been a leading advocate in promoting some of Lebanon's greatest bands and singers, including Adonis, Allen Haze, BandAgeCharlie RayneEileen Khatchadourian, Elepheel, Etyen, FareeQ el Atrash, Flum Project, Halib el Nawar, Jammit The Band, Joy Fayad, Karim Khneisser, Lazzy Lung, Loopstache, Mashrou’ Leila, Maya AghniadisMichelle & Noel Keserwany, OAK, Pindoll, Poly, PostCards, Rama's Whisper, Ramly, Sae Lis’, Sandmoon, Scrambled Eggs, Split Second, Tania Saleh, Tanjaret Daghet, The Banana Cognacs, The BnB Project, The Flying Filangees, The Incompetents, The Missing Pixels, The Wanton Bishops, Vladimir Kurimilian, Wake Island, Who Killed Bruce Lee, Yasmine Hamdan, Youmna Saba and Zeid Hamdan.

Lebanese Blogger Spoofs Study on Middle Eastern Women's Clothing

The question “How Should Middle Eastern Women Dress in Public” posed by the University of Michigan is attracting hilarious spoofs online. The content is so rich that an additional post to our first one was necessary.

When Washington Post Max Fisher shared the original image on Twitter, he wasn't expecting this response by WSJ blogger Tom Gara:

But the spoof that got the most attention was undoubtedly Karl Sharro's of KarlreMarks:

Interviewed on PRI, he explained his motivation:

“It's almost like putting Muslim women on a scale from 1 to 6, from being fully covered to not being covered at all, which I think is pretty absurd.”

How do police lineups in Lebanon work?

Lebanese blogger Karl Sharro tells us how the newly introduced police lineups work in Lebanon here.

Humour: Potential Targets in the Strike on Syria

The Qnion – or Lebanese blog Qifa Nabki, shares the scenario of the “likely military strike on Syria.”

The plan includes:

we’re primarily considering two sets of Tomahawk missile strikes (between 8 and 11) launched by the USS Mahan and the USS Gravely against a set of military bases in the Syrian desert, including but not limited to… [ruffles some papers]… and let me see if I can get these names right: the Marj Ruhayyil Military Airbase, Al-Nayrab Military Airbase, the Suwayda Army Base, the Marj al-Sultan Military Heliport… Wait, no scratch that. My bad. The heliport is not under consideration. I mean, it may or may not be under consideration. Let’s see, where were we? Oh, also the Shayrat Military Airbase and the Khalkh… you know what, I’m not even going to try to pronounce that one.

Lebanon: Blogger Beaten for Taking Photos

Lebanese blogger Habib Battah narrates how he was held against his consent, forced to delete photographs of ruins from his phone camera and repeatedly assaulted in this post on the Beirut Report. When he reported the case to his local police station, the officers in charge said it was his word against theirs. He adds:

(more…)

Who Benefits from Trafficking Women from Madagascar to the Middle East?

Aaron Ross reports on his investigation in the heart of the ongoing human trafficking of young women from Madagascar to Middle Eastern countries:

For some enterprising businessmen, the collapse heralded a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. So-called placement agencies sprang up in Antananarivo and other cities across Madagascar, promising the good life in Middle Eastern “Eldorados,” where monthly salaries usually ran around $200. The agencies would pocket upward of $2,000 for each successful transaction [..] As Madagascar’s economy spiraled downward, the number of migrants grew anyway. Some headed clandestinely to Lebanon with the collusion of government officials. Of late, however, the most popular destinations have been Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.

Ross also details the consequences from of economic sanctions of the coup in his report. The topic was also discussed by national observers here.

Lebanon: Don't Drink and Drive

Lebanon's traffic authorities have launched a don't drink and drive campaign ahead of New Year's eve celebrations. On Twitter, the traffic department shares this photograph:

Don't Drink and Drive - a traffic awareness campaign launched by Lebanese authorities ahead of New Year's eve celebrations

Don't Drink and Drive – a traffic awareness campaign launched by Lebanese authorities ahead of New Year's eve celebrations

Bad Cop, Good Cop and Other Cops in Iran Nuke Talks

Six world powers and Iran are discussing Iran's nuclear programme in a two-day meeting in Geneva. Lebanese satirist Karl Sharro comments on Twitter:

Lebanon: The Smell of Death

On August 23, two bombs exploded in outside two mosques in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli. Forty-seven people were killed, and over 500 injured.

Joey Ayoub, at Hummus for Thought, shares a must-read testimony of the heartbreak at the hospital of a friend who was in Al Salam mosque when the explosion happened.

The friend writes:

Perhaps the biggest pain they caused wasn’t the dead, nor was it the injured. The injured will heal, the dead will be martyrs. The biggest pain they have caused us to feel is the feeling of helplessness and confusion, wondering if we can do anything to make things better only to realize that we never can.

Lebanon's Happy Offshore Oil Billboards

Qifa Nabki writes:

“Lebanon’s Ministry of Energy and Water has launched a new [billboard] campaign promoting the benefits of off-shore oil exploration for the average citizen. The ads contain shots of smiling people aside captions like: “My children and I are staying in Lebanon“ or “I’m going back to work in Lebanon!“”

He continues, sarcastically “Why stop there? I think the Ministry needs a nudge in a more ambitious direction” and suggests adding: “Streets free of traffic jams, private jets, manaqeesh (a pizza-like Lebanese dish) with salmon and caviar, space exploration” etc.

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