Close

Donate today to keep Global Voices strong!

Watch the video: We Are Global Voices!

We report on 167 countries. We translate in 35 languages. We are Global Voices. Watch the video »

Over 800 of us from all over the world work together to bring you stories that are hard to find by yourself. But we can’t do it alone. Even though most of us are volunteers, we still need your help to support our editors, our technology, outreach and advocacy projects, and our community events.

Donate now »
GlobalVoices in Learn more »

Quick Reads + Latin America

Media archive · 8560 posts

Posts with Photos posts Photos Video posts Video

Latest stories from Quick Reads + Latin America

Delayed Construction Works in Brazil Fuel “(un)Happy” Video

The contagious feeling triggered by Pharrell Williams’ viral music video “Happy” inspired citizens of Porto Alegre, Brazil, to take advantage of the fact that their city holds the Portuguese word for “happy” in its name — but rather to express what's making them unhappy.

The video shows people dancing joyfully in front of delayed construction works for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Watch “Porto (un)Happy” below with captions in English:

Published on March 25, the video has already been watched over 250,000 times. Its creators use the Facebook page Porto un-Happy to promote the hashtag #MudaPOA (Change, Porto Alegre), as well as to collect mentions in the media and to clarify [pt]:

Nosso protesto NÃO é contra a Copa, e sim contra o atraso nas obras e o pouco caso com a população!

Our protest is NOT against the World Cup, but against the delayed construction works and the lack of care towards the population!

On the map We Are Happy From, you will find a video version created by the city's public administration. The video presents a very positive perspective, but it has been less popular, with 50,000 views.

Global Voices also reported on the ironic version of “Happy” from Rio de Janeiro.

Massive Online Campaign to Free Political Prisoner Oscar López Rivera

Photo from Facebook page 32xOscar.

Photo from Facebook page 32xOscar.

The international campaign to free Puerto Rican political prisoner Oscar López Rivera is asking people from all over the world to contribute in making the hashtag #freeOscarLopez a trending topic tomorrow, April 1st. Tweets should also include U.S. president Barack Obama's handle @BarackObama.

This year, López Rivera will have been imprisoned in the United States for 33 years on charges of “seditious conspiracy.” López Rivera, 70, is a fighter for the independence of Puerto Rico, a colony of the United States. Politicians, artists, and many people across different ideologies have united to ask the president of the United States, Barack Obama, to pardon López Rivera, who has been called the longest held political prisoner in the western hemisphere. For more information on Oscar López Rivera, see Facebook pages 32 X Oscar [es] and Free Oscar López Rivera Now.

15 Free (or Very Cheap) Things to Do in Bogotá, Colombia

Bogotá and its price points tend to get a bad rap. This is a very valid point when you consider that the average monthly salary in the city as of 2013 was just over 1 million pesos (about $500 at the current exchange rate), and that it has the biggest inequality gap of any city in Colombia, with Estrato 6 (the wealthiest economic level) making 4.8 million pesos per month on average, nearly 14 times the average income of about 350,000 pesos for people in Estrato 1 (the poorest level).

In her blog A Year Without Peanut Butter, Natalie lists 15 of her “favorite free (or very cheap) activities and places in Bogotá,” including free concerts in parks, public art exhibits, free museums, street performers, and the ciclovía (on Sundays and holidays certain streets are closed to vehicles so that pedestrians and cyclists can use them) :

You can’t really get to know this town until you stroll one of the main streets when it’s packed with bikers, rollerbladers, skate punks, kids on tricycles, dogs lounging in baskets or trotting alongside their owners, juice vendors, roadside bike repairmen and just about everything else. All you need to enjoy Ciclovía is a pair of shoes, some water and a serious appreciation for the best people-watching in central Colombia.

Brazilian Congress Approves Pioneering Bill of Rights for Internet Users

Marco Civil has finally been approved in the lower house of Brazil's Congress and next should be voted in Senate. The bill of rights for Internet users became a worldwide trending topic on Twitter, following a large-scale campaign that was promoted during the day of the vote, March 25, 2014, under the hashtags #MarcoCivil and #EuQueroMarcoCivil (I want Marco Civil).

The current version [pdf] of the bill preserves the provisions of net neutrality, freedom of expression and users privacy.

Former Minister of Culture, and famous musician, Gilberto Gil, who gave a face to Avaaz's petition “For a free and democratic Internet“, tweeted:  

We won! #MarcoCivil approved!! For a neutral web, freedom of expression and protection of privacy!

For Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago, this is “the best possible birthday gift for Brazilian and global Web users”. In a statement of support released on the eve of the vote he said the approval of Marco Civil “will help to usher in a new era – one where citizens’ rights in every country around the world are protected by digital bills of rights”:

Like the Web, Marco Civil has been built by its users – the groundbreaking, inclusive and participatory process has resulted in a policy that balances the rights and responsibilities of the individuals, governments and corporations who use the Internet. (…)  ultimately the draft Bill reflects the Internet as it should be: an open, neutral and decentralized network, in which users are the engine for collaboration and innovation.

Brazil's Internet Bill of Rights Ignites Storm of Posts

Activists who support Brazil's bill of rights for Internet users, known as the #MarcoCivil, and who have Facebook or Twitter accounts are invited to participate in a large-scale campaign on social networks to pressure the National Congress to vote on the current version of the bill. An article by Julie Rovono on TechCrunch explains how the lobby of telecom companies is threatening the net neutrality provision.

The mobilization is taking place today, March 25, 2014, under the hashtag #EuQueroMarcoCivil (I want Marco Civil). Voting may take place on the same day, though it has been postponed around 30 times [pt] since 2012. Anyone who wants to take part in the “compartilhaço” (“sharing storm”) can subscribe on the website “Save the Internet” from the social mobilization platform Meu Rio:

Vamos deixar claro para os deputados que a liberdade de expressão, a neutralidade da rede e a privacidade dos usuários não são negociáveis. O texto precisa ser aprovado como está!

Let's make it clear for members of parliament that freedom of expression, network neutrality and users privacy are not negotiable. The bill needs to be approved as it is!

‘The Subject': A New Crowdfunding Tool for Brazil's Independent Media

Aimed at providing an alternative to the traditional business model of media production, a new crowdfunding platform for independent journalism has been launched in Brazil. O Sujeito (The Subject) [pt] is hosted by the crowdfunding website Catarse, which wrote about the new venture [pt] coming at a time of transition for media funding:

O veículo impresso está em crise. O jornalismo não. Assim como sempre haverá música e cinema, independentemente dos grandes produtores, o jornalismo é autônomo em relação aos grandes meios.

Print media is in crisis. Journalism is not. As there will always be music and cinema, regardless of major producers, journalism is autonomous in relation to the big media.

Four projects mark the debut of this new venture: a Free Journalism School for youth; a documentary on Brazilian eco-villages; a publication on how to improve the work environment; and an investigation into people in Brazil who hold advertisement boards on the side of the road.

You can follow @osujeito_ on Twitter, “like” their Facebook page and watch the teaser below [pt]:

“Happy” Video Exposes the Other Side of Rio de Janeiro

Inspired by the ”worldwide contagious happiness” that was sparked by Pharrell Williams’ viral music video “Happy“, as can be seen in hundreds of dancing videos from around the world, Brazilian group of video-makers Jeitinho Carioca (“Shit Cariocas Say”) has created a local version for Rio de Janeiro with a satirical tone. 

Besides showing people dancing with a happy feeling, the video also exposes other not-so-happy current affairs in the city, such as the high cost of living, the racism problem, thievery and violence, as well as the construction works for the World Cup and Olympics. 

Watch “We Are Rio“:

Global Voices has also reported on “Happy” videos of Middle East and North AfricaHong Kong and the Pursuit of Happiness in Africa.

Unlocking Time: A Collective Virtual Album of Old Photos from Latin America

All links lead to Spanish-language pages

Summer in Unlocking Time: Inflatable animals in the sea. Beach photos from Uruguay, 1940!

Abrir el tiempo (Unlocking Time) is a virtual collection of old photographs from Latin America. Anyone can upload a photo and tell the story behind it. You can follow this collective album on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Zapatista Textbook Now Available in English

Put on your thinking caps because the first of four Zapatista textbooks from last year’s widely popular escuelita (little school) have been translated to English.

For those who are not yet familiar, the Zapatista Escuelita (Zapatista little school), brought 1630 students from around the world to learn what it really means to be Zapatista. Contrary to what some might believe, there’s a lot more to the Zapatista than “smashing the state” or looking good doing it!

John Ahni Schertow writes about the first English translation of the Zapatista textbooks in Intercontinental Cry, where you can download the textbook and see the dates for the upcoming translations.

You can read more about the ‘escuelita’ in Upside Down World.

El Salvador's Election Tribunal Announces Winner in Presidential Race

El Salvador's election tribunal announced that Salvador Sánchez Cerén of the left-wing FMLN (Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front) beat conservative candidate Norman Quijano from the ARENA (Nationalist Republican Alliance) party on Sunday's run-off election. Sánchez Cerén won with 50.11% of the vote.

Linda from Linda's El Salvador Blog served as an international election observer on Sunday. She shares pictures and reports in a two-part series (1, 2) in her blog.

World regions

Countries

Languages