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Höség: Water and Windproof Solidarity

Mirador de los Andes. Imagen en Flickr del usuario Boris G (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

Viewpoint of the Andes. Image on Flickr by usser Boris G (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

Höség is a Hungarian word that means heat, and that's what supportive people are giving children in the highest zones of Peruvian Andes, where temperatures are so low that “it's winter every day after five in the afternoon”.

Warm and functional. Thought on the needs of children who live over 9800 f.a.s.l. Waterproof and windproof. With fiberfill and fleece lining to keep warm but also comfortable. Hood, elastic cuffs and high collar neck to keep the cold out.
Coral color inspired by cochinilla, a natural dye from the Peruvian Andes, making it visible from a distance.
A happy jacket for kids between 0 and 16 years.
A jacket designed with love.

The idea of Hösėg is simple: when you buy a jacket, you give another one to a child in the Peruvian highlands, according to Juan Carlos Sznak, one of the promotors of the iniitiative:

Nuestro mensaje a los niños cuando le entregamos las casacas va más allá del simple hecho de abrigar, es darles calor humano.

Our message to children when we hand them the jackets goes beyond the simple fact of getting them warm, it's to bring them love and affection.

The jackets are personally delivered by Sznak and his brothers, the brains and hearts behind Höség.

COP20: Responsibilities of Capitalism On Climate Change

The 20th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and 10th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP20/CMP10) was held in Lima between December 1 to 12, and was chaired by the host country, Peru. During the conference, Bolivian president Evo Morales, emphatically appealed to consider climate change as a direct consequence of capitalist system and urged industrialized countries to accept the consequences of their actions:

Evo Morales urges to listen to indigenous people and to fight against capitalism during COP20.

Damián Profeta sums up the ten main points of Morales’ speech, and he highlisghts:

- ‘Hay que crear un Tribunal Internacional de Justicia Climática’ [encargada de] ‘juzgar a países que no cumplen sus compromisos y los tratados internacionales y a los que hacen mucho daño al ambiente’ [...]
- ‘Que el sistema capitalista asuma su responsabilidad en el cambio climático’ [...]
- ‘En la lucha contra el Cambio Climático los países del Norte nos han llevado a un terreno infecundo’ [...]
- ‘El medio ambiente debe ser administrado comunitariamente porque la naturaleza misma es comunitaria’

- An International Court of Climate Justice [in charge of] judging countries that don't fulfil their obligations and international treaties and those who harm environment a lot must be implemented [...]
- The capitalist systema should take responsibility on climate change [...].
- In the fight against climate change, the Northern countries have taken us to a sterile ground [...]
- Environment must be managed communally, as nature itself is communal

Some Twitter users answered reminding him his actions about the construction of a highway along the Isiboro Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (TIPNIS):

Evo proposes community property to save the planet? OK, let's stop the highway across TIPNIS and individual property by coca growers.

Bicycling 2,930 Kilometers for a Selfie With Uruguay's President José Mujica

After bicycling for 35 days accompanied only by his bike, 28-year old Brazilian Carlos Eduardo Lemos de Oliveira achieved his goal: he took a selfie with Uruguay's President José Mujica.

Brazilian guys takes a ‘selfie’ with Mujica after pedaling almost 3,000 km to Uruguay.

The loneliness of the journey from the city of Alfenas, in the state of Minas Gerais — in the center of Brazil — all the way to Mujica's home, on the outskirts of Uruguayan capital Montevideo, allowed him to reflect about some aspects of daily life that we usually take for granted, as summed up by G1 website:

Viajar sozinho tem suas vantagens. Você faz seus horários, impõe seu ritmo, decide quando partir e como chegar. Eu sempre digo aos amigos que para viajar assim, sem companhia, é preciso primeiramente estar aberto a fazer novas amizades.
[...]
No começo você desconfia de que as pessoas vão te achar louco por estar falando sozinho nas rodovias. Então você começa a perceber que não existem pessoas naqueles lugares e, num estalar de dedos, você se pega cantando no mais alto tom canções que você tem pavor de ouvir quando está em casa.

Traveling alone has its advantages. You make your schedules, you set the rythm, you decide when to leave and how to arrive. I always tell my friends that for an unaccompanied trip you first need to be open to making new friends.
[...]
At first, you mistrust that people will think you are insane as you talk to yourself on the roads. Then you start to notice there is nobody in those places and just like that, you are singing songs out loud that you would never sing while being at home.

The meeting with Mujica, which was the purpose of the trip, happened on November 21. Carlos Eduardo wrote:

De um lado, uma bicicleta, de outro, um fusquinha azul encardido. Não poderia haver um encontro mais apaixonante do que este que tive com o presidente do Uruguai, José Mujica. Aliás, foi tudo muito despretensioso e quase nada programado. “Pepe”, apelido de Mujica, é um homem de muita simplicidade.

On one side, a bike, on the other, a blue, dirty beetle. There probably won't exist a more passionate encounter than the one I had with Uruguay's President José Mujica. Furthermore, it all was very simple with nothing programmed. “Pepe”, Mujica's nickname, is a man full of simplicity.

Twitter also echoed Carlos Eduardo's journey:

It's good to have dreams, projects, and being able to accomplish them!!

This is a real president.

Argentina: Outstanding Tourist Attractions on Social Media in 2014

Wenceslao Bottaro presents us with the most outstanding tourist attractions on social media from the interior of the country, according to the II Edition of the Ranking of Tourist Attractions and Social Networks in Argentina 2014. He also explains that this ranking is important because:

[...] sirve cómo radiografía del trabajo que los destinos provinciales realizan en las redes sociales. Siguiendo la evolución de su performance en las redes sociales, nos damos cuenta de cuáles son los destinos que trabajan e invierten en Internet, en la generación de contenidos genuinos, en estrategias de promoción y difusión, cuáles son los que están más atentos a las tendencias actuales y, sobre todo, cuáles son los que dejan pasar la oportunidad de posicionarse y ganarse un lugar en el deseo de los potenciales viajeros.

[...] can be used as an in-depth analysis of the work that provincial destinations carry out on social networks. Following the evolution of its performance on social networks, we realize which are the destinations that work through and invest in the Internet, in generating genuine content, in promoting and spreading the word, which ones are more aware of the current trends and, above all, which ones don't leave their positioning to chance and instead attract the attention of potential travelers themselves.

Gráfico extraído del blog Blucansendel, utilizado con autorización

Chart from the blog Blucansendel, used with permission

According to the ranking, the province of Misiones, where the Iguazú Falls are located, ranks top of the list on Facebook with over 730,000 fans and an inter-annual growth of over 600,000 new fans. Then come the provinces of Salta with 359,702 fans, Tucumán (267,636), Córdoba (227,091) and Mendoza (226,354). The situation is different on Twitter, where the province of Tucumán is top of the list with 29,200 followers. This was the only place that had more than 20,000 followers, along with Córdoba with 18,900 followers, Salta (16,800) and Mendoza (14,900).

You can also see the first edition of the ranking, from the year 2013.

You can follow Wencesleao on Twitter.

This post was part of the 32nd #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on December 8, 2014.

Man's Best Friend: Dog Chases Ambulance to Be With His Owner

This happened near the city of Brasília, Brazil.

A homeless man was being transported in an ambulance after suffering a seizure. All of a sudden, the paramedics noticed something unusual: the man's dog was desperately following the ambulance. He kept going for some kilometers until he was finally allowed to enter the vehicle and join his owner.

The scene happened in March this year, but only went viral on social media this Christmas Eve. As Daily Mail Online reported, 42-year-old paramedic Caliomar Ferreira do Couto recorded the scene and said this was a first for him, after 19 years in the profession. At the hospital, the faithful dog patiently waited by the stretcher while his owner was being cared by the doctors.

Dog chases an ambulance in Taguatinga

AIDS Activist Freed After Kidnapping in Honduras

Keren Jemima Dunaway González, a teenage Honduran Aids activist who was abducted in the city of San Pedro Sula on Tuesday has been released.

Three unidentified men grabbed Keren, 18, with her mother near the offices of the Llaves Foundation, which helps children with AIDS. González, the head of Llaves, was freed, but Keren remains captive.

Police said her captors had asked for ransom but had released her after her mother assured them the family had no money.

San Pedro Sula remains one of the most violent cities in the world and has the world's highest homicide rate at 187 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2014.

Paddington Bear Gets His Peruvian ID

The National Registry of Identification and Civil Status (known as RENIEC) handed over a National Identity Document (DNI) to Paddington Bear, the popular British literary character whose biography says he is of Peruvian origin.

The identification card, which was given during a symbolic ceremony, is yellow, as it is with underage ID cards.

Paddington Beat got his DNI at Reniec.

Not everybody is happy, however, with the character's presence on Peruvian soil:

When the hell does he leave? Paddington Bear got his yellow ID card at Reniec headquarters.

The popular literary character is visiting Peru, as part of a campaign to promote tourism in the South American country.

Argentina: The Tourism Input in Economy

Blogging for Turytecnia, Adrián Martinez echoes the results of the survey published by the World Travel & Tourism Council, WTTC, where we can find and interactive infography with data from the tourism industry and its impact on the economy in different countries, where we can observe:

[...] la evolución que ha tenido en aspectos tales como la contribución económica del turismo, a puestos de trabajo, cantidades de turistas, e inversiones que se han realizado en esta actividad.
Suena interesante la evolución que ha tenido la Argentina en esta actividad, donde puede verse que la inversión se ve reflejada en resultados.

[...] the evolution in items such as economic contribution of tourism, jobs, number of tourists and investments made. it's interesting to note the evolution Argentina has had in this activity, where we can see that the investment gets reflected in results.

Captura de pantalla de estudio interactivo del WTTC, extraída del blog Turytecnia, utilizada con autorización

Captura de pantalla de la infografía interactiva por el WTTC, extraída del blog Turytecnia, utilizada con autorización

In Argentina, we can observe how just in 2013, 47,5 billion dollars entered the national chests thanks to the tourists that visited the country, which gets up tp 9,9% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). On the other hand, according to the report, tourism industry generated 1.685 jobs, 9,5% of existing working force. The report claims also that in 2013, 7,2 billions were invested in tourism, about 6,4% of total investments, although it's expected to grow 4,1% in 2014.

You can follow @Turytecnia and Adrián Martinez on Twitter.

This post was part of the thirty-third #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on December 1, 2014.

Mexico: An Unsatisfactory and Late Presidential Address

On Thursday, November 27, 2014, Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto addressed publicly Mexican nation to make a stand about the shocking events occured in Iguala and to announce a set of actions to be taken.

The address was a disappointment for most of the Mexican people, who expected more from their president. In this context, Fernando Vázquez Rigada responds ciítically to the presidential address and points out it was not only late, but it also lacked empathy towards the people. Furthermore, the announced mesaures weren't enough to face the current Mexican crisis:

La mención al combate a la corrupción fue blanda y retórica. Se asume el plan de la oposición, pero sin ser capaz de agregar nada ni de garantizar una nueva ética que se base en los mejores hombres, en las mejores prácticas, en un blindaje real e inmediato. Vendrá la implementación de las reformas por los mismos que han debido cancelar licitaciones, encubrir, coludirse.

Lo mejor fue la mención a la aplicación del modelo chino de estímulo al crecimiento. La pobreza no produce criminales, pero si divide y desgarra.

La nación esperaba el jueves a un ejecutivo y encontró a un legislador. Aguardaba a un líder que compartiera el dolor, que mostrara reflexión sobre sus errores propios, que asumiera los costos que le corresponden y, sobre todo, que inspirara a una sociedad harta y desconsolada.

The mention about fighting corruption was soft and rhetorical. The plan from the opposition might be guessed, but without the possibility of adding nothing on nor secure a new ethics based in new men, better practices, a real and immediate reinforcement. The reforms will be implemented by the same people who should have called off tendrs, concealed, colluded.

The best thing was the mention of implementing the Chinese model of growth boost. Poverty doesn't produce criminals, bit it does divide and rips up.

On Thursday, the nation was waiting for an ejecutive and came across a legislator. They were waiting for a leader that might share their pain, that might show some reflection upon his own flaws, that would assume the costs upon him and, above all, that might inspire a society that's fed up and inconsolable.

You can follow Fernando on Twitter.

This post was part of the thirty-first #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on December 1, 2014.

New Distribution of Colonies and Native Nations in Mexico City

On his personal blog Hbt, Olivera Herbert writes about a new district distribution (starting on October 2014) and the popular referendum about participatory budgeting 2015 (November 2014), that allowed us to assess and ellaborate a new Catalog of Colonies and Native Nations 2013 in Mexico City.

Herbert has prepared a chart of the 1,753 communities and 40 native nations and invites us to download it here, a *.kml file you can use on a free and open code SIG, such as QGIS. The author explains what a colony means geographically and the so called native nations:

De acuerdo a la Ley de Participación Ciudadana del D.F. la colonia es la división territorial del Distrito Federal y los pueblos originarios son asentamientos que mantienen la figura de autoridad tradicional de acuerdo a sus normas, procedimientos y prácticas tradicionales.

According to the Bill of Citizen Participation of Mexico City, colony is the territorial division of the Federal District and native nations are settlements that keep the figure of tradtional authority under its rules, procedures and traditional practices.

Herbert Olivera's account on Twitter is @oliveraherbert for further details.

This post was part of the twenty-eighth #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on November 10, 2014.

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