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Comic Explains the ‘Cold War’ Between Hong Kong's Pro-Democracy Protesters and Their Parents

Jason Li has translated a letter written by a web user named Cherish to her parents, which was published on citizen media website inmediahk.net, and turned it into a comic. The letter addresses the generational conflict triggered by the Occupy Central protests in Hong Kong.

Most of the pro-democracy protesters are under the age of 45 and grew up in a politicized Hong Kong society following the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. On the other hand, those older than 45 are mainly migrants from mainland China who settled in Hong Kong with a hope of improving their family's living conditions.

Take a look at what Cherish said to her parents:

UMHKComicEnglish

Six Hong Kong Police Officers Kick and Punch a Handcuffed Protester in a Dark Corner

Last night at 9:30pm, around 300 hundred protesters attempted to set up new barricade in Long Wo Road, near the government headquarter at Admiralty. Riot police took action to disperse protesters and arrested 45 of them. The process was brutal. The TV news showed that one of the protesters, identified as Tsang kin-chiu, a member of Civic Party, was intentionally brought to a dark corner where he was punched and kicked by six police officers.

The protesters action last night was a reaction to the police clearance of the barricades in major sit-in sites in the past few days. The massive sit-in action, dubbed Occupy Central protests, is to impose pressure on the Hong Kong government demanding a revision of the political reform package by incorporating the idea of “citizen nomination” in the election of the city's top leader.

Weapon of Mass Destruction in Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution

Mainland Chinese state-run media has been running editorials and opinion pieces to criticize the Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong, with emphasis on the destruction the street occupations have brought to ordinary people.

The Umbrella Revolution has also been labeled as “Color Revolution” backed up by foreign forces, in particular, the United State. Pro-Beijing law makers passed a motion on October 10 demanding an investigation of the mobilization of the massive sit-in action under the Legislative Council(Powers and Privileges) Ordinance.

In response to the smear campaign, DDED HK, created a video that imitates the China Central Television's news report on the students’ use of mass destruction weapon – umbrellas and birthday song – in Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution.

In the video, the umbrellas that protected the protesters from police pepper spray and tear gas were depicted as parachutes and ray guns. The birthday song, which was sang by the sit-in protesters, when they were surrounded and bombarded by the anti-occupation groups, was depicted as the most evil weapon.

Beijing Expects Hong Kong People to be Rubber Stamps

David Webbs a finance news commentator concluded that the Beijing decision on the nomination of Chief Executive candidates in 2017 is to turn Hong Kong people into rubber stamps.

Hong Kong Lawyers Protest in Black Against Chinese Government's White Paper

1,800 Hong Kong lawyers dressed in black marched through the city on 27 of June to protest against what they see as Chinese interference, a sign of growing concern about the rule of law in the Asian financial centre and a further act of dissent against Beijing. Photo by PH Yang at Demotix.

A total of 1,800 Hong Kong lawyers dressed in black marched through the city on 27 June to protest against what they see as Chinese interference.  a sign of growing concern about the rule of law in the Asian financial centre and a further act of dissent against Beijing. Photo by PH Yang at Demotix.

The protest is in response to the Chinaese government's recent white paper on the practice of “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Lion Rock Occupied

A group of mountain climbers hang a huge banner, "I want genuine universal suffrage" in Lion Rock, one of the most well-known landscape in Hong Kong.  The group explained their action to local media: “We were shock[ed] by CY Leung’s viewpoint that the poor should not have equality in election[s] and hope this action would be able to call public attention on the importance of universal suffrage.” Image from Hong Wrong.

A group of rock climbers hang a huge banner, “I want genuine universal suffrage” in Lion Rock, one of the most well-known landscape in Hong Kong. The group explained their action to local media: “We were shock[ed] by CY Leung’s viewpoint that the poor should not have equality in election[s] and hope this action would be able to call public attention on the importance of universal suffrage.” Image from Hong Wrong.

Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution in Mathematical Formula

A high school test paper on the background of Hong Kong umbrella revolution. via Facebook OCLP's page

A high school test paper on the background of Hong Kong umbrella revolution. via Facebook OCLP's page

The above high school test paper has gone viral in Hong Kong social media in the past few days. The test question is: What are the factors that lead to the September 28 Umbrella Revolution?

The student answered with a mathematical formula: 64+71+101+689+3=928.

The teacher marked the paper 0 and told the student to correct the answer. The student decoded the formula:

64 = the June 4 Incident in 1989 in Beijing. After the crackdown, Hong Kong people hold annual candlelight vigil demanding the vindication of June 4.
71 = on July 1 1997, Hong Kong, the former colony of Britain was handover to Beijing. Since then, every year, pro-Beijing political groups celebrate the reunification in the morning, while the pro-democracy civic groups rally for democratic reform.
101 = the China national day is on October 1.
689 = is the total number of votes that the current Chief Executive Leung Chun Ying obtained in the election committee, which was composed of 1200 members.
3 = the reform trio, a short term for the three major government officials responsible for the consultation of the political reform. The three officials are the Chief Secretary, Carrie Lam, Secretary of Justice, Rimsky Yuen and Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam.

The sum of the above is 928, September 28, the day when the police deployed tear gas to peaceful protestors who resisted with their umbrellas.

Rooftop Farming in Hong Kong

"Go Green Hong Kong" discussed the benefit of rooftop farming in Hong Kong.

“Go Green Hong Kong” discussed the benefit of rooftop farming in Hong Kong – Green roofs can help reduce three of the four top problems facing the society in the next 50 years: energy, water, and environment.

Warning Against Racial Nationalism in Hong Kong

Evan Fowler told a story about a conflict happened to his friends in a subway train. He compared the incident with its Sydney version in which a Chinese descend was called a “gook” and found Hong Kong passengers’ indifference to the racist remarks disturbing:

I believe the incident that my friend experienced was not only an unfortunate rarity, but also one that deserves to illicit a level of condemnation Hong Kong people rightly expected and did see in Australia. I also believe that our condemnation should be focused not only on the superficial racism of the remarks, but on the underlying racial-nationalism of the position.

Hong Kong Is ‘Haunted’ by China's ‘One Country, Two Systems’ White Paper

Famous blogger on mainland Chinese political news, @yanghengjun, ran into a protest against the mainland Chinese official document on the practice of “one country and two systems” in Hong Kong. As the document is called the White Paper, protesters dressed in white with white papers stuffed in their mouths, like Chinese ghosts:

It scares me! In the most crowded downtown area of Causeway Bay, I ran into a group of people dressed in white, strolling around with some white pigs. Their mouths were filled with white paper. It was evening and the streets were dark, the scene was quite terrifying… I walked near, it was an art performance against the “White Pig (Book)” [The pronunciation of "book" is similar to the word pig in Cantonese.], it is very creative and has left a deep impression on me!

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