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Stories from and

Russian Government IP Address Caught Editing German Wikipedia MH17 Article

IP addresses inside the Russian government continue to be active on Wikipedia, where a computer at the Russian Secret Service, the FSO, revised the German entry for Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, changing the word “separatists” into “rebels.” The Twitter bot @RuGovEdits, which automatically logs all Wikipedia edits made from Russian government IP addresses, caught five separate attempts by an FSO computer this morning to make the “rebels” language stick. The effort failed. German Wikipedia editors reverted the article's language to the original text, every time.

German Wikipedia's MH17 makeover, brought to you by the Russian government.

Revenge from the “Disgrace of Gijón” as Algeria and Germany Face Up Again at the World Cup

Algeria national football team in 1982 FIFA World Cup via wikipedia Public Domain

Algeria national football team in 1982 FIFA World Cup via wikipedia Public Domain

Algeria and Germany national teams are set to face up on June 30 in Porto Alegre in the knock-out round of the FIFA World Cup. The match will revive plenty of strong emotions from both sides because of their previous game in 1982 at the World Cup in Spain. In their first World Cup ever, Algeria shocked heavy favorites Germany in a 2-1 victory that is still recalled fondly by Algerian supporters to this day. However, Algeria was still eliminated in the first round because Germany and Austria conspired to get a draw that would send both team through and Algeria home. The match is known around the football world as the “Disgrace of Gijón“. Here are highlights of the 1982 Algeria-Germany fixture :

      

Inspired by FC Barcelona's Dani Alves, Germans Say No to Racism With #BananaSelfies

Photo by Justus Blümer via Flickr.  CC BY 2.0

Photo by Justus Blümer via Flickr. CC BY 2.0

People from around the world, including Germany, are posting photos of themselves with bananas on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to protest racism following an incident during a football match in Spain in which someone in the crowd threw a banana at FC Barcelona player Dani Alves. 

The Brazilian footballer responded by picking up the fruit and eating it. The banana thrower was banned from the stadium for life.

This heralded an international wave of solidarity and a new selfie trend using the hashtags #WeAreAllMonkeys, #SayNoToRacism and #BananaSelfie. It began in the world of sport, as here in a photo of young players for the football club 1. FC Köln with player Mišo Brečko:

Anti-racism workshop at #effzeh Kids Club with Miso #Brecko. #Weareallmonkeys #SayNoToRacism

The trend then took off in the world of politics, seen here in a photo of politician Kai Gehring and his fellow party members from the 90/Die Grünen coalition, who at the same time called for protests against right-wing extremism on May Day in Germany:

love bananas, hate #racism – fly your flags today for a united, open-minded Europe!

Protesters also took up the selfie trend during May Day anti-racism protests:

We're in #Altenessen. #weareallmonkeys #spd #essen

“Another Face of Africa”: Call for Photos, Stories

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

A group of young volunteers from southern Germany, many of whom have lived in Africa, are calling for photos, essays, videos, blog posts or poems by locals of five major African cities: Lagos, Addis Ababa, Gaborone, Kigali and Kinshasa.

With a forthcoming exhibition called “Sichtwechsel,” their goal is to show another face of Africa than what typically appears in German media — modern, urban, rapidly developing societies.

See their website at Missing-Images.com in English, French and German. The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2014.

INNOVATION: Containers as Student Housing at European Universities

 "Containers" at DTU Campus Village in Kongens Lyngby, Denmark via wikipedia CC-BY-SA-3.0

“Containers” at DTU Campus Village in Kongens Lyngby, Denmark via wikipedia CC-BY-SA-3.0

In order to alleviate the lack of student housing available across Europe, a few universities in Denmark, Germany, France (Le Havre) [fr] and Spain have tried to turn containers into student dorms. Containers appear to be the structure of choice because they are less costly and readily adaptable to include the necessary amenities. However, a few associations have already raised a few issues [fr] regarding thermal isolation and safety in the containers. 

German Offensive Beated Argentinian Defense

On El mago del balón (The magician of the ball), Spanish journalist José Eduardo Carratalá analyzes the national teams that played the final match on 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014, Germany and Argentina, where the European crew won, and compares how the German presented a mainly offensive team againt the defense of the South American team, who were finalists because they didn't receive any goals:

Alemania ha marcado 18 goles en 7 partidos (2,57 por encuentro). Suya es la mayor goleada del torneo (7-1 a Brasil en semifinales). También goleó a Portugal (4-0) en su debut. Ha marcado al menos un gol en todos sus partidos. [...]
[Los argentinos] llegaron a la final gracias precisamente al buen hacer de su portero y su defensa. De hecho, el único gol que ha recibido Romero desde la primera fase fue el de Götze en la final. Hasta ese tanto, el meta argentino llevaba 486 minutos sin recibir un gol.

Germany scored 18 goals in 7 matches (2,57 per game). They own the widest margin of the tournament (7-1 with Brazil in semifinals). They also defeated Portugal (4-0) on their debut. They have at least one goal scored in each of their matches. [...]
(Argentinian) made it all the way to the final match due to the good performance by their goalkeeper and their defense. In fact, the only goal Romero got since the group phase was the one by Götze on the final match. Until that goal, the Argentinian goalkeeper hadn't received a goal in 486 minutes.

Among the many records broken on this World Cup there is Miroslav Klose as the highest scorer in World Cups (16 goals) and the crew trained by Joachin Löw becoming the first European country to win in South America.

Follow José Eduardo for more information about sports on his blog and on Twitter.

This post was part of the eleventh #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on July 14, 2014.

EU Survey Indicates Correlation Between Anti-Minorities Views and Ideological Right

The French blog Rue89 analyzes the results [fr] of the Pew Center Survey on attitudes toward immigrants and minority groups in the European Union. Rue89 highlights that Roma population are the most ostracized minority group, especially in Italy and France :

Anti-Roma, Anti-Muslim Sentiments Common in Several Nations

It also highlights that negative opinions about Roma, Muslims and Jews are “consistently more common among people on the ideological right.” It is to be noted that it is forbidden for a french public institution to collect population data based on ethnicity [fr] or race.  

Returning Human Remains is Not an Apology, Says Namibia to Germany

Human remains who were killed during the colonial war (early 20th century) were returned to Namibia by Germany in March. However, Namibians still demand a formal apology from the German government as Tendai Marima,  a post-doctoral researcher in African literature, wrote on the Think Africa Press website :

The skulls and skeletons that made their way home this month were seized by Germany back when Namibia − then ‘German South-West Africa’ − was one its colonies. Namibia was first occupied by the European power in 1884, and in 1904, the Herero and Nama peoples − dispossessed of their land and livestock − rose up together in an attempt to expel the Germans.

In an early revolt, over 100 German settlers and soldiers were killed, but the ensuing repression of the uprising was relentless and brutal. Over the three years it took to suppress the uprising, an estimated 65,000 Hereros and 10,000 Nama were killed, representing some 80% and 50% of those entire populations respectively. It is considered the first genocide of the 20th century.

Last Chance to Submit Papers for Re:Publica 2014

re:publica 14 - INTO THE WILD

The organizers of Re:Publica in Berlin, Germany have extended the deadline for submission of papers for speaking topics to February 7, 2014. The topic for this year's conference, which typically attracts around 5,000 people, is INTO THE WILD, exploring the unknowns of a post-Snowden era. Submit your papers today! The event will be held on May 6-8. Expect to see Global Voices there too. #RP14

‘AFTER 25 Conference': Tokyo and Berlin Discuss Creative Culture

As Berlin and Tokyo mark 20 years of friendship as sister cities, representatives of two creative industries, including Chairman of the Club Commission of Berlin Marc Wohlrabe and Takahiro Saito, a lawyer and member of Let's Dance, a consortium that fights against Japan's dance regulations, will come together for the AFTER 25 conference on March 1, 2014 in Tokyo to discuss how creative culture can contribute to the socio-economic development of both cities: 

After the fall of the Berlin wall, extreme social, cultural and economic changes transformed the city into a unique playground. Today, 25 years later, it attracts creatives, tech startups, social entrepreneurs, and investors from all over the world.

Berlin recognized its creative sub-cultures as part of its identity and history, which now act as key drivers for tourism and economy. This transformed Berlin into a unique, successful city demonstrating how supporting creativity can grow into key economic and social factors fueling innovation and growth.

This dramatic yet positive change that Berlin went through leads us to the question: what role can Tokyo’s creative cultures play in laying the foundations for the city’s next phase? How can we paint a brighter future by aligning the creative potential of these two cities?

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