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Was Singapore Airlines’ Facebook and Twitter Message After the MH17 Crash Insensitive?

A Singapore Airlines flight on March 29, 2014. Photo by Flickr user Aero Icarus. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

A Singapore Airlines flight on March 29, 2014. Photo by Flickr user Aero Icarus. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

After news broke out about the Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash in eastern Ukraine, Singapore Airlines posted this message on Facebook and Twitter:

Many netizens accused the airline of being insensitive. Sophie Chang commented on Facebook that “a better way for the airline to do is to express condolences first.” But Stephen Chapman believes that the statement “was intended to bring calm in a general sense.” Ryan Ik appreciated the clarification but he also felt that “without any words of sympathy, the update feels very cold.”

Insensitive or not, this short update has since then become a viral message in a matter of hours.

China's National Mahjong Team Loses To Japan

Mahjong, originated from China is considered a national game. The fact that China's national mahjony team lost the the fifth Open Mahjong Championship in France and finished in 37th place out of 51 teams came as a shock to the country. Worse, the individual title was claimed by a Japanese competitor. Nanfang.com translated an article from New Beijing Daily on the reasons behind China's defeat.

Chinese Activist Hu Jia Attacked

Prominent Chinese activists Hu Jia was attacked last night on July 16 in Beijing. He reported the incident in his Twitter:

Today (July 16), just now at 20:12, I was attacked by a number of plain clothes cops near the east wing of Caofang subway station at Chaoyang district, Beijing. They drove away immediately. As I dropped my glasses, I could not see the car plate number. Now I feel sick and have to rest on the pavement. Will call the police. Hu Jia.

A red cross was marked on the white fence next to the spot where I were attacked. My car was parked at the spot where I was ambushed.

I have just filed a written report at the Changying police station. The police officer (035658) escorted me back to the spot where I was ambushed. Now he has left. I will drive to the nearby Minhang Hospital to treat my wound before going home. The police had gone through the surveillant video and told me that they could not identify the number of the attackers’ car plate.

I remember clearly, a top guy wearing black clothes kicked my abdomen. They were very professional, caught my throat and hit my eye. In gangster's language, the method is called “eye blocking”. It was a heavy hit and my nose bled. Then came a round of random hits and kicks.

Warning Against Racial Nationalism in Hong Kong

Evan Fowler told a story about a conflict happened to his friends in a subway train. He compared the incident with its Sydney version in which a Chinese descend was called a “gook” and found Hong Kong passengers’ indifference to the racist remarks disturbing:

I believe the incident that my friend experienced was not only an unfortunate rarity, but also one that deserves to illicit a level of condemnation Hong Kong people rightly expected and did see in Australia. I also believe that our condemnation should be focused not only on the superficial racism of the remarks, but on the underlying racial-nationalism of the position.

Indonesians Light a Thousand Candles for Peace in Palestine

Scores of Indonesians gather in central Jakarta, the country's capital, to light 1,000 candles in protest to the Israeli airstrikes in Gaza Strip. Indonesia is the world's most populous Muslim-majority nation.

Indonesians pray for the  Palestinians who were killed in the airstrikes launched by Israel. Photo by Abdullah Arief Siregar. Copyright @Demotix (7/11/2014)

Indonesians pray for the Palestinians who were killed in the airstrikes launched by Israel. Photo by Abdullah Arief Siregar. Copyright @Demotix (7/11/2014)

The Arrest of CCTV News Anchor and Refection on China's Public Relation Business

The arrest of CCTV news anchor Rui Chenggang was related to his ties to PR firm Edelman subsidiary in China. Silicon Hutong took the opportunity to reflect upon public relation businesses in China:

Two issues prevent widespread improvement in PR industry ethics in China. First is a persistent exclusivist belief that because this is China, things are done the Chinese way, and always will be. Operating ethically is seen as naive at best, and culturally imperialist at worst (“how dare you impose your values on us!”)

The second issue is fear. PR executives and their agencies believe that if they don’t take advantage of every opportunity, however morally ambiguous, they will lose revenue and clients to competitors who lack – or opportunistically ignore – their moral compasses.

English Learning Business in China

Soho Business' info-graphic on learning English in China. Via China File. Currently, there are more than 3,000 companies in China offering English classes. Fees range from several hundred to several thousand dollars.

Soho Business’ info-graphic on learning English in China. Via China File.

Currently, there are more than 3,000 companies in China offering English classes. Fees range from several hundred to several thousand dollars.

Typhoon Glenda Batters Luzon Island in the Philippines

Typhoon Glenda (International name: Rammasun) wrought havoc in Luzon Island in the Philippines. Netizens are using the Twitter hashtag #glendaph to monitor the situation.

A fallen tree in front of the presidential palace in Manila. Photo from the government's Tumblr page.

A fallen tree in front of the presidential palace in Manila. Photo from the government's Tumblr page.

China: No More Cantonese Mother Tongue on Guangdong TV News

Despite the strong public sentiment against the language policy that marginalizes the Cantonese mother tongue in Guangdong province, Guangdong TV quietly replaced Cantonese news broadcast with Putonghua. How do people from Guangdong react to the change? See Charles Liu's translation from Nanfang.com.

Chinese Women Protest Against the World Cup

12 women staged an anti-World Cup protest on 7 of July in Shanghai. Photo from Weibo via Offbeat China.

12 women staged an anti-World Cup protest on 7 of July in Shanghai. Photo from Weibo via Offbeat China.

Offbeat China explained why women are so angry and how the World Cup has destroyed relationships in China.

They are primarily pissed about two things: 1) their partners neglecting family responsibilities due to late-night game watching; 2) reckless gambling on games.

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