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Quick Reads + China

Media archive · 4358 posts

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Latest stories from Quick Reads + China

Baidu Censors New Citizens Movement Website

After Chinese court affirms Chinese lawyer and activist Xu Zhiyong’s conviction of four-year sentence in prison for assembling a crowd to disrupt order in public places, New Citizens Movement website, of which Xu was one of the founders, disappeared from Baidu search results. 

This is not the first time that information relating to Xu Zhiyong has disappeared from Baidu and other China-based web sites. 

Expat Life in China: A Review Of Unsavory Elements

Unsavory Elements is an anthology of true stories about foreigners “on the loose” in China. Through their stories, the authors and journalists from the book also explore illegality and ethics in China. As China Law Blog describes: 

Ranging from transactions and deeds that would raise the eyebrows of those enforcing America’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act to stints in prison for drug dealing to flagrant violations of prostitution laws, what results is 300 pages of business and law school case studies written not in legalese but in literary prose, and what a read it is.

“It's a Girl”: Campaign Against infanticide Feminicide in India and China

The website MujeresMundi, directed by Peruvian Belgium-based communication specialist Xaviera Medina, is involved with the awareness campaign It's a girl against infanticide feminicide in India and China:

Girls are killed in a gendercide routine in any one decade than people were slaughtered in all the genocides of the twentieth century. Incredibly, however the issues involved have barely registered the attention of the international community. How to explain the strange silence in the face of the biggest human right issue?

The piece includes an interview with Evan Grae Davis, producer of the documentary film l It's a girl!, who says “I wouldn’t have consider myself as an activist until I started to produce and direct It’s a Girl”.

Taiwan's Sunflower Movement on Reddit

Four Taiwanese students joining the Sunflower Movement opened an Ask Me Anything on Reddit to answer questions regarding their protest against the closed-door trade deal with China.

Taiwan #CongressOccupied: Wild Lily Turns into Sunflower

The Wild Lily is still the symbol to support the new-generation student movements that fight for democracy. Photo from Susan Bomin. CC: NC.

Wild Lily is still the symbol to support the new-generation student democracy movements. Photo from Susan Bomin. CC: NC.

The sunflower sent from the protesters inside the Legislation Yuan. Photo from Christine Hepburn. CC: NC.

A flower shop owner delivered sunflowers to the protesters inside the Legislation Yuan. Photo from Christine Hepburn. CC: NC.

The Wild Lily student movement took place in March 16 1990 at Freedom Square in Taipei is the most significant historical event that marks the democratic struggle in Taiwan. As a result of the movement, temporary provisions effective during the period of Communist rebellion in Taiwan was terminated and the Taiwanese congress was reformed in 1991.

Twenty-four years have been passed, in March 18 2014, another student movement took place in the Legislation Yuan in Taiwan. The students protest against the government’s black box process of the trade deal between Taiwan and China. On the third day of the demonstration, the media starts calling the action Sunflower student movement when a flower shop owner delivered sunflowers to the protesters [zh] as a form of support. The image of sun reflects people's hope to shed light to the black-box free trade negotiation between Taiwan and China governments.

The Appeal of WeChat and Self-Media in China

’s , semi-private messaging service has replaced Twitter-like Sina Weibo as a leading channel of alternative information. Tea Leaf Nation has explained the appeal of WeChat and “self-media” in general to young Chinese generation, and the implication of the sudden crackdown

China's Crackdown on WeChat

Some popular public WeChat accounts were shut down on the night of March 13, 2014 without forewarning. Most of these accounts became a popular venue for discussing politics during the past few months since the big crackdown on Weibo last year. 

These deleted accounts include highest profile WeChat account by legal scholar Xu Xin and self-media like True Words Channel (Zhenhua pindao). Visitors attempting to access those accounts receive a message that the given account “has been repeatedly reported,” and upon investigation has been shown to be “in violation of the rules, and all of its functions have been deleted.” The message advises users to stop following the accounts. TeaLeafNation has more details. 

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Chinese President Xi Jinping Cartoons

Under a special section dedicated to China’s on-going National People’s Congress, iFeng.com, a pro-Beijing TV broadcaster based in Hong Kong, featured series of Chinese president Xi Jinping cartoons. The cartoons are about Xi meeting with ordinary people. Some stories in the cartoon are based on real events. 

Offbeat China has translated the dialogues in the cartoons.  

Video: China's Social Media Reacts to the Kunming Attacks

The attack at a railway station in China’s Southwestern Kunming city has led to heated discussions on Chinese social media. Many netizens think western media were trying to downplay the incident by calling it “a senseless act of violence.” Watch the video below to find out more comments and discussions on Chinese social media. 
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Censorship Instructions During China's “Two Sessions”

Chinese government has issued  instructions during the “Two Sessions“ to Chinese media. The instructions, which have been leaked and distributed online, include: Do not report hearsay concerning high-level cadres, such as the news on March 2 about Zhou Yongkang; Keep a reliable handle on the developments in Ukraine. CHINA DIGITAL TIMES has translated the instructions into English. 

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