Close

Donate today to keep Global Voices strong!

Watch the video: We Are Global Voices!

We report on 167 countries. We translate in 35 languages. We are Global Voices. Watch the video »

Over 800 of us from all over the world work together to bring you stories that are hard to find by yourself. But we can’t do it alone. Even though most of us are volunteers, we still need your help to support our editors, our technology, outreach and advocacy projects, and our community events.

Donate now »
GlobalVoices in Learn more »

Quick Reads + Arts & Culture

Media archive · 7556 posts

Posts with Photos posts Photos Video posts Video

Latest stories from Quick Reads + Arts & Culture

An African Tale of The First Love Story Ever Told

The website Histoire Africaine/African History [fr] narrates the tale of the oldest love story ever told, the story of Osiris and Isis [fr] and explains what makes it stand out [fr] from the other love stories. Osiris was the king god of Egypt and Isis his queen. Set, his brother, murdered Osiris to take over the kingdom. Isis find and restore Osiris’ body, resurrecting him and they conceive their son Horus. The author writes that the story is rich of lessons for the African continent [fr]:   

While Osiris is rightfully mentioned at every funeral because he was the One who first attained the eternal life, one must note the crucial role that Isis played in allowing Osiris to persevere. She embodies the concept of love, the one that never gives up, that rescues loved ones and frees them from darkness. 

  

From right to left: Isis, her husband Osiris, and their son Horus on wikimedia CC- Share Alike 1.0

From right to left: Isis, her husband Osiris, and their son Horus on wikimedia CC- Share Alike 1.0

The Last Place of Cultural Dynamism in Luanda is No More

Marissa Moorman writes about the destruction of Elinga Theatre, the centre of cultural life in Luanda, Angola:

Since 1988, Elinga Theater, has anchored cultural life in the Angolan capital. On March 22, 2014 José Mena Abrantes, director of Elinga Theater, as well as poet, dramaturge, journalist, and communications consultant (read: sometimes speechwriter) for Angolan President José Eduardo dos Santos, announced the impending destruction of Elinga’s historic space.

This comes after the theater group was told in January this year to vacate by the end of last month.

Come April 1, fear turned to action. Central Angola launched a campaign on Facebook to get bodies in front of Elinga and stall the destruction. A petition began circulating on April 2 (online and at Luanda schools), after Ângela Mingas, professor of Architecture at Lusíada University, suggested that 1,000 signatures delivered to the National Assembly on April 18, UNESCO’s international day for monuments and sites, would pack symbolic punch.

On 15 October, 2014, Global Voices Online wrote an article the theatre titled “Angola: Elinga Theatre, from Glory to Oblivion.”

Expat Life in China: A Review Of Unsavory Elements

Unsavory Elements is an anthology of true stories about foreigners “on the loose” in China. Through their stories, the authors and journalists from the book also explore illegality and ethics in China. As China Law Blog describes: 

Ranging from transactions and deeds that would raise the eyebrows of those enforcing America’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act to stints in prison for drug dealing to flagrant violations of prostitution laws, what results is 300 pages of business and law school case studies written not in legalese but in literary prose, and what a read it is.

Bermuda: Go Fly a Kite!

In Bermuda, kites plays an important role in the island’s cultural heritage.

Repeating Islands says that Bermudians are gearing up for the 2014 Kite Fest.

Jamaica: Social Art

It can only create a healthier cultural environment if multiple independent spaces, encouraging social interaction and supporting creative practice were operating.

ART:Jamaica blogs about the importance of social art spaces.

Cambodia's Angkor Wat Now on Google Street View

We can now explore the ancient city of Angkor Wat in Cambodia through Google Street View. This video highlights some of the stunning temples of Angkor Wat.

Delayed Construction Works in Brazil Fuel “(un)Happy” Video

The contagious feeling triggered by Pharrell Williams’ viral music video “Happy” inspired citizens of Porto Alegre, Brazil, to take advantage of the fact that their city holds the Portuguese word for “happy” in its name — but rather to express what's making them unhappy.

The video shows people dancing joyfully in front of delayed construction works for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Watch “Porto (un)Happy” below with captions in English:

Published on March 25, the video has already been watched over 250,000 times. Its creators use the Facebook page Porto un-Happy to promote the hashtag #MudaPOA (Change, Porto Alegre), as well as to collect mentions in the media and to clarify [pt]:

Nosso protesto NÃO é contra a Copa, e sim contra o atraso nas obras e o pouco caso com a população!

Our protest is NOT against the World Cup, but against the delayed construction works and the lack of care towards the population!

On the map We Are Happy From, you will find a video version created by the city's public administration. The video presents a very positive perspective, but it has been less popular, with 50,000 views.

Global Voices also reported on the ironic version of “Happy” from Rio de Janeiro.

Why Learning Italian Still Makes Sense

"L'Italiano...non serve a niente?", from Alma Edizioni's contest page.

“L'Italiano…non serve a niente?”, from Alma Edizioni's contest page.

As Italian publishing company Alma Edizioni was busy organizing an event about the Italian language in Rome, they received an unexpected letter [it] from someone who defined himself as a “disappointed student”:

Why? What's the point of studying Italian today? [...] No one wants to study a language that no longer has a place in the world, the language of a country that keeps getting worse day by day. [...] For years I've studied Italian which today, however, is neither a language of culture, nor of work opportunities.

In order to respond to such poignant questions, Alma Edizioni decided to let students from around the world give their opinion through a contest, which could be followed through the hashtag #litalianononserveaniente (the Italian language is useless).

Participants were invited to produce a one-minute video clip to explain why studying the language of the ‘boot of Europe’ in 2014 is still worth it. More than 80 groups of students took part in the contest, according to the company's YouTube channel.

Manga “1F” Takes You Inside Fukushima Nuclear Plant

Ichi Efu, by Kazuto Tatsuta.

Ichi Efu, by Kazuto Tatsuta.

A manga by artist going by the name Kazuto Tatsuta takes readers inside the crippled nuclear plant of Fukushima Dai-Ichi, or ichi efu (1F) – as insiders dubbed it – a place he himself worked in 2012, a decision he took in a period of financial struggle.

The graphic novel “1F: The Labor Diary Of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant,” (いちえふ ~福島第一原子力発電所労働記~) offers a rare peek into the plant which was hit by one of the most powerful tsunamis in Japan's history on March 11, 2011.

The plant currently remains accessible exclusively to plant workers, employees of Tepco – the operating company – and few representatives of the press, on occasional tours.

In the pilot chapter, he describes the daily routine of the laborers, the different masks, layers of protective suits and clothing they have to wear every day, the use of an Active Personal Dosimeter which alerts them when they reach the daily radiation dose allowed, and their trip back and forth from the J-village, a former sports center that was converted into a residence for the laborers after the accident.

Tatsuta's manga won the 34th Manga Open award in 2013.

Documentaries from 29 Countries Are SIMA 2014 Finalists

SIMA 2014

These are films we want to watch!

37 powerful documentary films from 29 countries have been selected as finalists for the 2014 Social Impact Media Award (SIMA).

The stories are from: South Africa, Switzerland, Zambia, the UK, Russia, India, Israel, Chile, Western Sahara, the US, Lebanon, Cambodia, Syria, Burkina Faso, Romania, Somalia, Denmark, Jamaica, Greece, Palestine, Haiti, Bolivia, Italy, Nicaragua, Egypt, Kenya, Canada, Burma, and Costa Rica.

Global Voices is a community partner of SIMA 2014.

World regions

Countries

Languages